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Art Super Magazine, IT




ROGER WEISS | EATING : THE ACT OF CONFIDENCE



Roger Weiss was born in Switzerland and began experimenting with photography from an early age. Graduated with Mention of Excellence from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan (Italy). His curiosity for the expressions of humankind open him the path to an artistic approach. He performs as an artist, art director as well as a fashion photographer. Observing the body, its possibilities, its personal victories and its concealed baggages, Roger Weiss analyzed, by a new way to use the photographic medium in which the obsession with cataloguing, repetition, and decomposition build a disturbing and full of details sight of the human body. This interview is a new step in the poetic of the artist through the investigation of the body and its aspects. Through the use of a new media: the video, Roger Weiss try to investigate even more in depth the feelings that the body reveal through his actions and movements during the process of feeding.
 

Why a topic related to food and eating?
 Man is a being capable of inventing stories, postulates holding up the entire world as we know it. Behind every human being there is an incredible “architecture”, consisting of “bricks” or items such as knowledge, prejudices, experiences, habits, indoctrination, education, and so on. A vessel that, with time, we structure more and more, until becoming the fortress. The food, the act of eating, creates a spontaneous passage that can allow to get around these fortifications and get past the mask.

Actually, eating is a basic practice derived from the instinct of survival. The act itself is the merging point between two dimensions constantly connected with each other: the deepest one – our innermost and mysterious side –  and the external structure well known to all, where sounds, the eyes followed by the mouth, the tongue and the nerve endings translate into the so-called nourishment process. A development that occurs through an unconditional act of confidence that reveals itself in one the greatest human related moments of intimacy: eating. An act of will which allows lowering our defences to favour communication and the transition from what is external and foreign towards the most inner and private part of our body. In other words, this process generates life itself.

How do you think you can connect videos with your poetics always linked to the photographic medium? What kind of differences have you noticed?
Archivi Intimi  brings together private moments through a collection of videos created in my studio during the break between a photo session and the other. I face the video like a photograph in motion, a still image, by adding the element of sound. I have replaced the research of the detail, its my way of capturing images, with a microphone that let me to pick up amplified vibrations produced by the act of eating. Inserting in the image in the end, they create a real timeline.

What is your feelings observing the videos? What differences and what similarities among the subjects?
How much can be natural and spontaneous a person who is asked to eat in front of a camera? I am convinced that no matter the degree of spontaneity but only the repetition of an act; through endless attempts you can arrive at a relevant synthesis  in which there are authentic glimpse. What I try to do is to offer an opportunity to catch them.



What is your relationship with food and what’s your feeling about being observed?
I am very bashful but I like to observe others. I eat thinking that am gonna choose better the next day. I swallow most of the food without consciousness, for example products that I don’t know so well. I guess I can be more aware day by day and with time, create a more profound consciousness.



interview by Annalisa Scandroglio


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D'Scene Magazine







THE PERSPECTIVE OF ROGER WEISS



Artist ROGER WEISS is one of the few contemporary artists on the scene who successfully manage to use photography as an inspiring art medium, while creating showstopping and original visualizations. Our contributor SAV LIOTTA sits down with Roger to talk about his beginnings, his creative process and the hidden message behind his artworks.


You are a well-established young artist can you tell us how you started your first approaches to the camera?
My approach to camera has been very gradual, initially fascinated by the desire to handle machines for me with mechanical mysteries and experience the dark room, slowly, I realized that staying behind a goal would have allowed me to relate to others more easily. From that moment on, I’ve always had people who helped me by giving me some of themselves that I have carefully taken care of in my work.


What are the first images that have marked your childhood?
I have no memory of a specific image. What echoes in me, from my childhood, is the refusal to attribute an aesthetic sense to a human figure. I was literally extraneous to knowing how to connect the functional part of the individual’s portions of the body to something that came close to the idea of harmonic. Then, over time, I gradually moved away from the detail, in the name of a vision that allowed me to perceive the whole and get used to what today I feel as beautiful.


What was the idea behind your “Human Dilatation” series?
From a perfectly functional requirement The idea has been developed from the I am Flesh series, a total of 35 subjects portrayed systematically, through which you can sweep the body without attributing an artistic value. I was expecting to keep the photographic material assembled for this project and to study it further, and so it was. I crossed those bodies like real two-dimensional maps. What I needed to go further was a sum of accents that would allow

me to approach my way of perceiving the human being. Human Dilatations is the result of these modulations.


What do the dilated shapes of your subjects symbolize?
I do not believe in the concept again as it is seen today, I rather think that there are people who have gone a stretch of road before me and others who will do it afterwards. Sometimes the roads cross and from there, in a dialectical view, can give rise to other paths parallel to those tracks that flock to creating a world to throw away what has just been conceived since it has already transitioned, bodies that become form first and for what they perceive an archetypal sense of the human being.


So, the transformations of your models, the elongated body parts, they transmit the power the strength of the human body, extreme beauty, could one say a new aesthetic sense?
To have a look of the contemporary man stripped of the two elements that distinguish his research: physical perfection and the current power or role, of the mind is what each image represents.

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Digit! Magazine, DE



AUSWEITUNG DER KOMFORTZONE



Mithilfe komplexer Shooting- und Postproduktionsprozesse dekonstruiert der Schweizer Roger Weiss den weiblichen Körper und stellt dem medialen Schönheitsideal irritierende Aktkompositionen gegenüber. Von Peter Schuffelen


Es sind verstörende Bilder, die der Schweizer Fotokünstler unter dem Namen „Human Dilatations“ – übersetzbar etwa mit „die Ausweitung des Mensch(lich)en“ – produziert hat. Nackte Frauenkörper mit überlangen Gliedmaßen und gestreckten Torsi, die Proportionen sind buchstäblich „verrückt“, in die Länge gezogen, bisweilen erinnern sie an die Skulpturen des ebenfalls aus der Schweiz stammenden Bildhauers Alberto Giacometti. Die Prints, die Weiss von der Serie fertigt und in kleiner Stückzahl auflegt, sind von großem Format und von atemberaubender Detailtreue – theoretisch ließen sie sich bis auf vier mal zweieinhalb Meter aufblasen. Die visuelle Wirkung der hohen Auflösung von 47.244 x 32.864 Pixeln erfährt man indes nur, wenn man direkt vor den überlebensgroßen Inkjetdrucken steht – weshalb Weiss auf seiner Website Details herausvergrößert hat: Hautfalten, Fingernägel, Augenbrauen, Hautunreinheiten, Abschürfungen, Schwielen, Tattoos, alles gestochen scharf, in makroskopischer Ansicht und dazu gnadenlos ausgeleuchtet. Weiss, von Hause aus Modefotograf, hat zu Beginn des Projekts mit männlichen und weiblichen Models unterschiedlichen Alters experimentiert, sich am Ende aber für junge, attraktive Frauen entschieden – aus konzeptuellen Gründen, wie er im digit! Interview erklärt. Trotzdem: Mit klassischen Nudes, mit erotischer Fotografie gar, hat

„Human Dilatations“ bei aller Nacktheit in etwa so viel zu tun wie ein Hering mit den euphemistischen, in Photoshop zu unwirklicher Perfektion hochgejazzten Werbesujets oder Erotik-Sites.

Der Grund: Weiss meidet die Unvollkommenheit nicht etwa, er zelebriert sie geradezu. Der Absolvent der Mailänder Akademie der Schönen Künste hat sich durch die japanische Kintsugi-Technik inspirieren lassen, eine traditionellen japanischen Methode zur Reparatur von Porzellan, welche die Versehrtheit des Materials absichtsvoll betont, indem sie die Bruchstücke mit einer Kittmasse kunstvoll zusammensetzt, der Gold- oder Platinstaub beigemengt ist. Angelehnt an das ästhetische Leitbild des Wabi Sabi erhebt diese Technik die Unvollkommenheit zum Schönheitsideal. Weiss adaptiert das Prinzip des Fragmentierens und Wiederzusammenfügens zu einem neuen ästhetischen Ganzen fotografisch. Das spiegelt sich nicht nur in den finalen Bildern des Werkzyklus‘ wider, sondern auch im Schaffensprozess. So bestehen die einzelnen Bilder aus 200 oder mehr Einzelmotiven. Weiss lichtet dazu den kompletten Körper von unten nach oben mit Objektiven unterschiedlicher Brennweite ab und rekonstruiert den Körper aus den einzelnen Shots in einem schier uferlosen, bis zu 14 Stunden dauernden Composing-Prozess (siehe Interview), den er auf seiner Website als Zeitraffervideo dokumentiert. Dank dieser Technik ist der Betrachter in der Lage, jede einzelne Körperstelle bis ins letzte Detail zu „erfahren“, alle „Makel“ inklusive. Die ungefilterte Konfrontation mit dem Körperlichen wie auch dessen Verzerrung mögen auf den ersten Blick irritieren, ja vielleicht sogar schockieren. Sie unterstreichen im zweiten Moment aber die Mannigfaltigkeit des menschlichen Körpers. Indem er ihn gezielt verzerrt, hinterfragt Weiss das medial vermittelte uniforme Muster (weiblicher) Attraktivität. Zugleich erklärt er die Imperfektion zum begehrenswerten ästhetischen Prinzip.


„Natürlich ging es mir darum, das klassische, medial vermittelte Schönheitsideal infrage zu stellen“, sagt der Tessiner Fotokünstler.„‚Human Dilatations‘ sucht die Zeichen der Unvollkommenheit und Hinfälligkeit des Körpers, löst sich durch das Spiel der Verzerrungen vom stereotypischen und heuchlerischen Begriff der Schönheit und fördert damit das Bild des Weiblichen als Ganzem. Gleichzeitig war es mir wichtig, deutlich zu machen, dass es um meinen, also um einen männlichen Blick auf den weiblichen Körper geht.“


Aufklärerische „Fleischbeschau“: „I am flesh“



Noch offensichtlicher ist dieser männliche Blick in Weiss‘ Vorgängerprojekt, das den eindeutig zweideutigen Titel „I am flesh“ trägt. Statt mit Verzerrungen arbeitet er hier mit den Mitteln der Standardisierung. Der Zyklus umfasst 35 Aktaufnahmen junger, attraktiver Frauen, die in identischer Weise frontal, stolz und mit maximaler Körperspannung vor der Kamera posieren, die Arme hinter dem Rücken verschränkt.
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Die Ganzkörperportraits sind ungeschönt, gnadenlos ausgeleuchtet, zentralperspektivisch fotografiert und von einer unbarmherzigen Auflösung, die mit demokratischem Blick alles gleichermaßen betont: das Gesicht, den Rumpf, Vagina, Brüste, die Haut. Auch wenn der Projektname etwas anderes suggeriert: „I am flesh“ hat ebenso wenig mit erotischer oder gar pornografischer Fotografie zu tun wie „Human Dilatations“. Der erotischen Objektivierung steht gerade diese „objektive“ Blick des Fotografen entgegen. Irritierend sind aber nicht nur das Uniforme, sondern auch wieder die kleinen und größeren „Defekte“, darunter Pickel, Tätowierungen, blaue Flecken, Narben, Brüste mit Implantaten, ein amputierter Unterschenkel oder eine amputierte Brust. Am Ende hat „I am flesh“ etwas zugleich Menschliches wie Androides. „Ich habe die Standardisierung gewählt, um in dieser Serie meine persönliche Sicht möglichst vollständig zu eliminieren“, sagt Weiss. „Was mich vielmehr interessiert hat, war, dass man jedes Detail sieht. Es ging mir darum, eine Art Landkarte des jeweiligen Körpers zu schaffen und zugleich die Würde jeder einzelnen Frau zu bewahren, die durch ihren stolzen Blick zum Ausdruck kommt.“


Als Nächstes plant Weiss ein Projekt, das beide Werkreihen – „Human Dilatations“ und „I am flesh“ in einem dialektischem These-Antithese-Spiel zu einer neuen Synthese treibt. Auf das Ergebnis darf man getrost gespannt sein.


„Die menschliche Suche sichtbar machen.“



Herr Weiss, was uns auffällt: In „Human Dilatations“ sind die Gesichter der Frauen kaum oder gar nicht zu sehen. Warum?
Weil es mir nicht darum ging, das einzelne Individuum zu zeigen, ich wollte vielmehr einen verallgemeinernden Effekt erzielen, einen ästhetischen Effekt, der für alle Frauen gleichermaßen gilt, eine Art Totem, wenn man so will. Außerdem wollte ich auf jene beiden Elemente abheben, die die Suche des zeitgenössischen Menschen bestimmen: das Streben nach körperlicher Perfektion und die dominierende Rolle, die der Verstand spielt.


Sieht man von den Verzerrungen ab, sind alle Models jung und schön. Warum?
Ich wollte, dass man sich auf die ungewohnten Perspektiven und die reine Form konzentriert und nicht auf Merkmale wie etwa eine faltige Haut, die vom Eigentlichen ablenkt.


Woher stammen die Models bei „Human Dilatations“ und „I am flesh“?
Das waren in beiden Fällen Freundinnen von mir, die mitgemacht haben, weil sie an mein Langzeitprojekt glauben. Gerade die frontale Konfrontation mit dem Körper bei „I am flesh“ war nicht einfach für die, die mitgemacht haben – zumal man ja auch das Gesicht sieht. Ich bin sehr froh, dass die Modelle mitgemacht haben – ein echtes Geschenk.


Jedes einzelne Bild von „Human Dilatations“ ist aus 100, 200, manchmal sogar 300 Einzelaufnahmen zusammengefügt. Warum diese große Anzahl?
Es ist vor allem eine Frage der hohen Schärfentiefe, die ich erreichen wollte. Obwohl ich sehr starkes Blitzlicht und kleine Blenden nutze, ist der Schärfentiefenbereich wegen des geringen Aufnahmeabstands ziemlich begrenzt. Angenommen, ich fange mit einer Hand an, dann ist bereits der Arm unscharf, also „scanne“ ich den Körper nach und nach mit der Kamera ab.


Wie müssen wir uns das Shooting vorstellen?
Es gibt, grob gesagt, drei Phasen. Als Erstes nutze ich ein Makro oder ein 50-mm-Objektiv und fotografiere frontal. Wenn ich Verzerrungen einbauen will, fotografiere ich mit einem Weitwinkelobjektiv aus vielen unterschiedlichen anderen Perspektiven. Die Gesichter bzw. Köpfe fotografiere ich hingegen mit einem Tele.


Warum arbeiten Sie mit einer Kleinbild- und nicht mit einer Mittelformatkamera?
Das hat praktische Gründe. Schon bei einer Kleinbildkamera summieren sich die Datenmengen wegen der Vielzahl der Einzelbilder auf 20 Gigabyte. Würde ich mit einer Mittelformatkamera fotografieren, müsste ich mir einen ultrapotenten Spezialrechner bauen lassen, um die Verzerrungen hineinzurechnen.


Was haben die gelben Punkte auf dem Körper der Frauen zu bedeuten?
Das sind Markierungen, die mir beim Composing helfen. Sie zeigen den Punkt, an dem die Schärfentiefe abriss. Ich habe sie auf den Körpern belassen, um diesen Prozess für den Betrachter sichtbar zu machen. Das Composing und die Postproduktion dauern pro Bild 14 Stunden und mehr.


Ist das nicht ein sehr ermüdender Prozess?
Nein, für mich hat das etwas von einem Mantra. So sehe ich, wie die Arbeit nach und nach in all ihren Details wächst, bis ich die gewünschte Form erreicht habe. Es hat etwas von der Arbeit eines Bildhauers.


Neben Ihren freien Projekten arbeiten Sie für Modezeitschriften und Modehäuser, die ja völlig andere ästhetische Paradigmen haben. Wie passt das zusammen?
Ziemlich gut. Die Modefotografie hat mich gezwungen, absolut professionell zu arbeiten – schließlich geht es darum, ein perfektes Produkt abzuliefern – eine gute Schule. In meinen freien Arbeiten bin ich hingegen wirklich frei.




Mark



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Hestetika Magazine, IT






ROGER WEISS – HUMAN DILATATIONS




Che cosa accade quando il corpo femminile si distacca dall’idea di perfezione, liberandosi degli stereotipi di bellezza dei falsi miti imposti dalla società? Attraverso la sua visione, Roger Weiss, ci introduce a una comprensione più profonda del corpo femminile distaccato dai preconcetti che definiscono la bellezza nel mondo di oggi. Il suo sguardo fotografico percorre minuziosamente ogni dettaglio del corpo ritratto, non omettendo nessuna imperfezione, spesse volte celate, ora invece necessarie per rendere il soggetto totalmente umano e unico. Le opere di Roger Weiss ritraggono donne monolitiche, forti e imponenti, ma che portano con sé tutta la morbidezza, leggerezza, carnosità e cedevolezza della loro femminilità.


Perché fotografi?
Fotografare è acquisire, in un tempo relativamente breve, una grande quantità di informazioni relative al mio oggetto di studio: la donna.

 Perché fotografi in questo modo?
Scomporre e ricomporre i miei soggetti, soffermandomi su ogni singolo dettaglio, mi permette di dilatare il tempo della posa, di far crescere l’opera scatto dopo scatto e dedicarmi all’analisi di ogni singolo particolare, altrimenti celato e, apparentemente, non significativo.


Forse non esiste una regola, probabilmente è soggettivo, ma credo che in genere uno si fa un’idea di un’altra persona guardandola nel suo insieme e magari, dopo, in un secondo momento, soffermandosi sui dettagli. Tu parti dallo studio minuzioso di ogni singolo dettaglio, per arrivare poi al suo insieme completo. Perché questo procedimento inverso?
Sono i singoli segni ad animare un quadro. Penso a Campo di grano con volo di corvi di Van Gogh, le cui pennellate sono un’esplosione di una miriade di tracce vibranti, un invito, solo in un secondo momento, e dopo averle distinte nitidamente, ad allontanarci e a socchiudere gli occhi per percepirne, nel suo insieme, l’incredibile energia vitale di cui sono portatrici.


Hai dichiarato più volte di essere una persona contemplativa, hai studiato molti anni chitarra classica e l’hai poi abbandonata perché “non riuscivi a vivere l’attimo”. Per questo le tue pose sono lunghe e dettagliate? In termini di tempo, ricordano le prime esposizioni della dagherrotipia.
Hai bisogno di dilatare il tempo, frammentarlo e poi metterlo insieme per godere del momento?
Non riuscire a stare nell’attimo è per me una mancanza che cerco di colmare attraverso la mia ricerca, senz’altro uno dei motivi per cui mi sono avvicinato alla fotografia e al laborioso processo che impiego per far mia un’opera. É solo durante l’evoluzione lavorativa e, in seguito, di contemplazione, che riesco a focalizzare la giusta attenzione verso il mondo: solo in quel preciso momento il tempo diviene meno ostile e produce in me quell’irrefrenabile desiderio di giungere alla fine di un processo di sintesi che applico ad ogni opera.


La fisiognomica ci insegna che attraverso il viso, lo sguardo di una persona, si riesce a capire il suo vissuto, a meno ché non la si ritragga in pose naturali che raccontano in qualche modo la personalità del soggetto. Le tue figure, se penso a Monoliths, ma anche a I am Flesh, sono tutte incentrate su di un format sempre uguale, impersonale e statico che apparentemente non racconta nulla del soggetto…
Il punto del mio lavoro è privare ogni opera di una propria identità legata alla persona ritratta, in sostegno ad una figura riconducibile a tutte le donne o a nessuna in particolare.


Come rendi possibile questa cura e monumentalità dell’opera? Puoi descriverci in modo pratico il tuo modus operandi? 
Ogni singolo dettaglio del corpo viene acquisito fotograficamente in modo minuzioso attraverso centinaia di scatti che poi vengono riassemblati attraverso la mia visione. Questo modus operandi mi permette di raggiungere due scopi per me essenziali: il primo è quello che ogni opera conservi una moltitudine di informazioni fotografiche, altrimenti impossibili da ottenere; il secondo punto è legato alla possibilità di creare distorsioni e prospettive esasperate grazie all’impiego di differenti ottiche di ripresa e alla relativa scelta delle immagini da assemblare insieme.


Qual è il concetto su cui si basa Human Dilatations?
Human Dilatations è uno sguardo sull’uomo contemporaneo spogliato dei due elementi che contraddistinguono la sua ricerca: perfezione fisica e il potere/ruolo attuale della mente. Ogni immagine rappresenta, di fatto, un corpo distorto nelle proporzioni di alcune sue parti che prevale su di una testa che scema senza lasciare traccia di sé. Nel corpo vedo l’esperienza manifesta di ciò che siamo, senza la quale rimarrebbe solamente il risultato di un processo evolutivo sempre in movimento e lontano dall’immagine primordiale. Il mio percorso è nato con l’approcciarmi all’immagine della donna nel nostro tempo e lo schematismo a cui la sua figura è stata ridotta, un insieme di canoni e modelli a cui far risalire la donna/individuo, invece che il contrario. Human Dilatations non teme i segmenti della cedevolezza del corpo insieme alle sue imperfezioni, ma accompagna l’immagine femminile ad apparire nel suo insieme come una forma altra, in un gioco di distorsioni che permette di rapportarsi all’immagine in modo cangiante, distaccandosi completamente dal gusto stereotipato ed ipocrita del bello.


Quante ore di lavoro ci sono dietro ogni tua opera?
A grandi linee una settimana per ogni immagine.


Ho visto che stai leggendo i diari di Alberto Giacometti, sfogliando alcune pagine ho trovato interi appunti, pubblicazioni, “ricerche sperimentali” e dialoghi con André Breton composti solo da domande, a volte surreali, che lui si poneva e che poneva, e ponevano, al suo lavoro. Anche tu tieni un diario? Anche tu ti poni così tante domande? E quante risposte trovi in grado di darti nuove consapevolezze?
Non regolarmente, ma raccolgo scritti personali da diverso tempo. Porsi domande è implicito nella condizione umana. Ma è per le risposte che ha senso mettersi in gioco.


Rimanendo su Giacometti, anch’esso artista svizzero, prendo a caso un paio delle sue domande e le rigiro a te, curiosa di sapere come risponderesti pensando al tuo lavoro: È adatto alle metamorfosi?
Alla metamorfosi e alla dinamicità. L’opera prende forma come accade in un film, attraverso un susseguirsi di singoli fotogrammi.


Qual è la sua situazione spaziale in rapporto all’individuo?
Lavoro bidimensionalmente su soggetti ai quali conferisco una plasticità scultorea.


Gli artisti hanno sempre bisogno di forti emozioni, di chi e di cosa ti innamori?
Del bello, di ciò che fa scattare il mio desiderio di conoscenza. Il tema del bello ha radici nel nostro essere più profondo ed è determinante nella sfera primordiale di ciò che accende il desiderio: motore trainante per il raggiungimento di tutto quanto comporti fatica.


Sei nato e cresciuto in Svizzera da padre svizzero-tedesco e madre italiana-meridionale. Hai studiato in Italia diplomandoti con lode all’Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera. Vivendo quotidianamente queste due realtà e abitando in un luogo di confine, ti senti più italiano o svizzero? Perché?
Mi è difficile identificare me stesso con un colore di bandiera. Cerco di stare a un senso civico che mi permetta di coesistere con gli altri senza privare nessuno della propria libertà. La Svizzera rappresenta un insieme di diverse culture e lingue racchiuse in uno spazio relativamente piccolo, al centro dell’Europa, ma senza farne parte. È come avere una casa con più uscite. Mi sento vicino a questo modo di essere.


Sei stato appena invitato in Costa Rica all’università di fotografia della capitale per tenere un seminario sulla tua tecnica fotografica e nello stesso periodo a partecipare ad una esposizione presso Snap! Space in Florida. Cosa ci racconti di queste due esperienza?
In Costa Rica ho vissuto una bellissima esperienza fatta di tanti splendidi particolari, ma ciò che mi è rimasto più a cuore è stato il confronto con gli studenti che mi hanno ricordato quanto sia importante rendere trasparente il proprio percorso per dar luce a nuove realtà; e la bellezza nel relazionarmi a nuovi soggetti da fotografare fuori dal mio studio. Per quanto riguarda Snap! Space ho avuto un feeling immediato con Patrick, il gallerista. Zurighese di nascita e da due decenni negli USA, ha scoperto il mio lavoro un paio di anni fa e, da allora, abbiamo cercato una giusta occasione per presentare una selezione dei miei lavori di grande formato presso una delle sue gallerie a Orlando.


Interview by Valentina De’ Mathà




THESE PHOTOGRAPHS EXPLORE NEW PERSPECTIVES OF FEMALE BEAUTY



Inspired by ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi, photographer Roger Weiss pieces together hundreds of photograph fragments to break down beauty ideals




After finding himself increasingly disassociating with imagery depicting the female form and viewing anatomy as devoid of all meaning, reduced to a set of codes and combinations as opposed to the curves and flaws that make us human, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss became increasingly frustrated with the lack of humanity throughout imagery that represents what makes us human.

Aiming to expose the lack of meaning in our contemporary visual representations of the female body, his series “Human Dilatations” (which originally appeared on Fotografia) aims to remove this indifference, pushing our physical forms to the extreme through distortion, embracing the so-called ‘imperfections’ that have lead to our exaggerated beauty ideals within modern society. Inspired by Kintsugi, (a Japanese reparation technique that uses gold to fill cracks), Weiss fragments his subjects into multiple images – assembling hundreds of fragments of photographs of the same subject that are taken from different perspectives to ensure every facet of the model is depicted in focus. Below we sit down with the photographer to discuss hypocritical beauty, aesthetic functions and the woman as a modern day totem.



When did you first pick up a camera?
My first camera was a black Nikkormat that my father gave me for a photography class at school. I immediately felt a sense of freedom linked to the object itself and to the idea that through this box I would be able to better understand my own thoughts by putting it down on paper. However, after producing the first prints I was so disappointed that I abandoned it and only resumed using it many years later at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts.

How did you get the idea for “Human Dilatations”, and what is the series all about?
Modern life is rooted in a telematics dimension of which the head has become the undisputed symbol, and the body is superfluous unless it is so perfect that it can be put on display to perform an aesthetic function alone. “Human Dilatations” eliminates these two elements to show us a body with parts of exasperated proportions and a head that wanes without trace, to create a rift between the vulnerability of the human and the two pillars that distinguish the contemporary man: physical perfection and the power/role of the mind.


Photography Roger Weiss
What inspires you so much about the female figure?
The comparison with women, my companion piece, originates from the desire to nurture a personal awareness that becomes wider and richer each time, through a dialectic vision. In this process, photography is the medium that more than any other allows me to log details that would otherwise get lost. In the beginning, it was all about storing information that I freely acquired, letting the subject become a hero of himself. Nowadays, through a more structured work, I try to go beyond one’s own identity.

Thereby changing it to a figure that can be ascribed to all women and none in particular. In “Human Dilatations”, I gave substance to my vision of the woman while maintaining a certain level of detachment from the beauty stereotypes of our times. Initially, I drew inspiration from primordial figures like the Venus figurines dating back to the Palaeolithic period and their symbolic meaning, to then initiate a broader and freer journey, which I embarked on in search for my idea of perfection – my contemporary totem.

“Each period has its own standards and I believe that this is necessary to evolution, to define limits that are in turns demolished in order to create new and broader ones” – 




You've previously mentioned the idea of the modern totem- how does the idea of this come into play throughout the series?
My work is based on transformation. I change from the individual to shapes which do not only represent their group but are more the container of our feelings formed by taboos – the most ancient prohibitions – by desire, and by fears as if they are embodied in a totem and its laws. There are two ways of creating: the first is to eliminate the superfluous to free the work of art that is contained in the raw material, the second is to add to the raw material until we reach to the limit that we imposed upon ourselves. Like a sculptor, I have found in the woman the raw material from which I have eliminated what I considered unnecessary to extract my modern totem. The totem forges thoughts and represents the whole around which rituals can be created.  It encloses everything that people can think or desire, it represents the relationships between men and women, thus becoming a taboo. A taboo with its most ancient prohibitions, which remains intact because it may not be touched.


Do you wish for the series to make a wider comment on the way we view the female body as a society?
Everyone is responsible for what they spread. In my case I give form to, and reveal, my images. Everything that this entails is subject to who decides to confront it, and to what extent they do so. My wish is to be able to transmit my signal, among the infinite existing ones, that may provide an additional basis for reflection.


Photography Roger Weiss
Why do you choose to create short films to accompany the series?
One of the challenges I encounter in my work is how to display pieces that should be enjoyed in real life on the internet. They are loaded with information and are designed for large-scale viewing. That is why I have decided to create short videos that enable the viewer to approach the detail and perceive the otherwise hidden nature.


You've said desire is important to your practise, but how does this manifest itself in your imagery?
I believe that I am an aesthete and naturally susceptible to what is currently thought of as beauty. Each period has its own standards and I believe that this is necessary to evolution, to define limits that are in turns demolished in order to create new and broader ones. The question of beauty is is rooted in our deepest self, in our most primeval sphere – in determining what triggers our desire: the driving engine behind the achievement of everything that requires effort. In my mind, the direction for an artist is the one synonymous with dedication to the search for alternatives to the dominant thoughts in our society while remaining loyal to those same existential questions that have accompanied us since the day of reason – who we are, what is the sense of our lives, where are we going.

“The dehumanisation and commodification of women belongs to a specific cultural heritage, which is difficult to eradicate”



How do we move away from sexual objectification of the female form?
The dehumanisation and commodification of women belongs to a specific cultural heritage, which is difficult to eradicate. Though one cannot give up such a position from one day to the next I still believe that, even in their smallness, great things may gradually change. Breaking these cycles that take us rationally back to before the experience took place could be the first step to create new scales of values. Before the image of the woman as an object I have placed my wish to create images that are born from the incompleteness with which men share their lives. I focused on the reinterpretation of the body through the assistance of perspectives and distortions for which we have less experience, and through the obsessive collection of hidden information that is related to the photographic detail of the captured surface. From this process I have created a rift between what we know through our daily stereotype-based experience, and things against which we build defences


Text Ione Gamble

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FotoRoom, IT
 




HUMAN DILATATIONS 



Roger Weiss Creates Mind-Blowing Portraits of Dilated Female Bodies




Swiss photographer Roger Weiss shares some background to his incredible Human Dilatations portraits, where the bodies of the photographed women appear dilated and distorted. The effect is reached through a compositing technique inspired by an ancient Japanese art…

Hello Roger, thank you for this interview. What are your main interests as a photographer?
Thank you, it’s my pleasure. At the center of my photographic practice is the female figure: it’s a main source of inspiration for me and shapes my artistic reflections.


Please introduce us to your Human Dilatations series: what is your main intent in creating these images?
I constantly produce figures of women in which I seek my contemporary Totem, an ideal shape, a creation that can contain many elements and distill the essence of things. Human Dilatations originates from this desire. It’s not an art series, but rather the testimony of my daily failures.


How do you think images of distorted female bodies fit the ideas you want to express?
Each image represents a body, some with parts characterized by more or less distorted proportions. The body imposes itself over the head, which is dwarfed to the point of being almost irrelevant. My work is an observation of the modern-day human beings free from two of the things they desire more strongly: physical perfection and the power of the mind. From these premises I approach critically the representation of women in our time and the schema her identity has been reduced to – a set of canons and models that the female individual has to adhere to.


You cite depictions of the female figure dating back to the stone age as a primary inspiration. How exactly did these help you conceive the Human Dilatationsimages?
The ideal representation of women embodied by some primitive artifacts clearly feature symbols that denote the fragility of life and mankind’s constant march towards progress. Human Dilations embraces these aspects and contrasts the “logic civilization” that has led to the loss of the “human civilization”: in the name of a greater order, we forgot about who we are, the least absolute and definitive beings of the planet.


Can you describe the elaborate composition technique you use to create your images, and how long does it typically take to finish one?
My technique is inspired by kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer. I recently made a video that shows the construction of one of my Monolith images: I obtained it by assembling 268 fragments of photographs of the same subject taken at different perspectives. It took 14 hours to complete.


For many of your images you create short videos that “delve” into the pictures to show details of the photographed bodies. Why do you think it’s important to focus on these details?
Suppose I’m observing a real body: I could get closer to it to explore it in detail. My vision of the whole would then be replaced by my perception of its particulars, thus triggering a complex analytical process. I intend to make this a possibility in my photographic practice as well, and at the same time I want to initiate a perpetual motion through which I break into fragments, decompose and reassemble what I observe, obsessed by the details that nurture this endless cycle. For me, details show what we would be inclined to hide due to our culture.


How do you reconcile your work as a fashion photographer with your personal projects, which subvert the stereotypes of fashion photography?
In the same way that I reconcile watching a film by Andrej Tarkovskij and one by Quentin Tarantino: they’re both products of our culture that acquire value in different moments of my existence.


Your latest body of work My Beautiful Broken Women also uses images of dilatated female bodies. What is different in this series from Human Dilatations?
The idea for My Beautiful Broken Women came to me while working on my monolith series. I wanted to show those beautiful faces I had concealed in Human Dilatations. Beside the faces, I focused my attention on the silent marks’ of the models’ lives through specific symbols: a scratch, a puppet snake, a compass, a pin, etc.


How do you hope viewers react to your work?
I hope to arouse their curiosity for new point of views over pre-determined answers.


What have been the main influences on your photography?
Desire.


Who are some of your favorite contemporary photographers?
The Bechers and the Düsseldorf School photographers, Karl Blossfeldt, Wolfgang Tillmans and many others.


Choose your #threewordsforphotography.
Women. Monolith. Space.





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Les Blogs, CH


DE l'ART HELVÈTIQUE CONTEMPORAIN


rubrique des arts plastiques et de la littérature en Suisse

« De la campagne au Paléo : Le monde étrange et pénétrant d’Anne Golaz | Page d'accueil | Raymond Cauchetier photographe de Jean-Luc Godard »

UN HOMME EN MOUVEMENT : PORTRAIT DE L’ARTISTE DE THURHOVIE ROGER WEISS



Qu’est-ce qui vous fait lever le matin ?
Le désir de retrouver mon atelier.


Que sont devenus vos rêves d’enfant ?
Je suis encore entrain de les affronter.


A quoi avez-vous renoncé ?
A tout ce qui n’est pas en état de m’accompagner dans ma direction.


D’où venez-vous ?
Je suis originaire de Horn, Canton de Thurgovie.


Quelle est la première image qui a frappé votre émotion ?
Le visage d’une femme.


A qui n’avez-vous jamais osé écrire ?
A celles et ceux que je savais qu’ils ne répondraient pas.


Que représente pour vous la femme ?
Dans la femme je cherche mon totem contemporain, ma forme parfaite, la création capable de contenir le Tout et de distiller l’essence des choses.


Qu’est-ce qui vous distingue des autres artistes ?
J’ai de la difficulté à identifier et à l’identifier avec les étiquettes, simplement je me situe dans une direction qui est mon parcours et je souhaite que d’autres personnes puissent s’insérer dans mon chemin.


Où et comment travaillez-vous ?
Dans mon atelier toujours à l’écoute de mes questions.


Quel livre aimez-vous relire ?
« De Rerum Natura » (de Lucrèce).


Quand vous vous regardez dans un miroir qui voyez-vous ?
Un homme en mouvement.


De quels artistes vous sentez-vous le plus proche ? 
Valentina De’ Mathà et Josef Weiss.


Que voudriez-vous recevoir pour votre anniversaire ?
Passer un an loin de ma réalité.


Que défendez-vous ?
L’idée que pour une conception plus haute il est possible de toujours nous remettre en jeu.


Que pensez-vous de la phrase de Lacan « L’amour c’est donner quelque chose qu’on n’a pas à quelqu’un qui n’en veut pas » ?
L’amour est une invention de l’homme sur laquelle il est plaisant de jouer.


Et de celle de Woody Allen « La réponse est oui mais quelle était la question » ?
Que la question était juste évidemment.


Quelle question ai-je oublié de vous poser ?
Voudriez-vous me faire un portrait pour  « Human Dilatation » ?


Entretien réalisé et traduit de l’italien par Jean-Paul Gavard-Perret le 23 juillet 2015.


Interview by J-Paul Gavard-Perret






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Vogue Italia, IT
 





ROGER WEISS



The body feels, it has its own language, which is not the limited verbal one, but the far richer one of the senses and feelings. You can come close to a body, look at it, touch it and smell it but the body cannot be read: like art, it belongs to the silent realm of moods and emotions.

It is perhaps the impossibility of “reading” the body, alongside its being at the core of mechanisms related to urges and desires, that has fascinated the humankind since the dawn of time, so much so that it has been chosen as favourite subject of investigation in paintings and cave engravings.

Reproduced, studied and dismembered, the body is the starting point of pictorial writing, of art: from Cèzanne to Picasso to the breaking of the human figure of Cubist artists like De Chirico, Matisse and Bacon down to the more recent Lucian Freud and Jenny Saville, many are the artists that devoted their search to the primordial image.

It is in this field that we should place the investigation initiated by Roger Weiss, a Swiss artist who graduated with the highest grade from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan. I was familiar with Weiss’ work titled “I am Flesh” in which the artist’s obsession with cataloguing, repetition and breaking down is undoubtedly present but, in my opinion, it is with “Human Dilatations” that Roger Weiss makes real progress into his expressive maturity. In this work, alongside the previously explored themes, new ones come into play and, in particular, through the deformation and distortions a notable signature style and aesthetic search emerges, even though this may yet not be totally conscious.

Here is below my interview with Roger Weiss:



What is the inspiration and thinking behind Human Dilatations?
In Human Dilatations, I gave substance to my vision of the woman while maintaining a certain level of detachment from the beauty stereotypes of our times. Initially, I drew inspiration from primordial figures like the Venus figurines dating back to the Palaeolithic period and their symbolic meaning, to then initiate a broader and freer journey, which I embarked on in search for my idea of perfection – my contemporary totem. Human Dilatations is born out of subjects that are fragmented and later reassembled. In a fashion similar to the Kintsugi Japanese technique (meaning: golden repair), I work on fragments and photograms that I assemble and harmonize into large format works in which the body, in contrast with its vanishing head, becomes the absolute protagonist. In the precisely studied positions of the subjects I use for my works, the position of the head is always only hinted at, which deprives each work of the identity of the portrayed subject, thereby changing it to a figure that can be ascribed to all women and none in particular.


How did it happen that you chose photography as a means of expression?
Photography is still something I feel conflicted. Times and times again I tried to fall in love with it without ever accepting the feeling of living it as an extension of myself. It is rather a tool that allows me to maintain a sufficient level of detachment from what goes on around me and to investigate further, beyond my limits. I recall three distinct moments that led me to start expressing myself using such medium. I received my first Nikon from my father during my childhood; this unveiled a pleasure for the object in itself rather than the use I could have made of it. The desire to embrace it came later through an image linked to my teenage years and that has not left me since. One night I woke up from my bed and stopped to observe the lying body of a woman: my first instinct was to portray her in her natural beauty, but I resisted it as I would have woken her up. Since then I embraced photography as a means to approach and capture fragments of the lives of all those people that accompanied me through my journey by offering me a part of them/theirs. That period opened me up to a reality that would have left an indelible mark on my following works, starting from I am Flesh. Since then I learned about and shared fragments of existences marked by suffering I had no experience of. Physical violence, sexual and psychological abuse suffered and endured by those same young women that I deemed carefree and that had, instead, learned to fight pain through their desire to react and overcome it.


You often talk of beauty standards dictated by society…I wholly agree but don’t you think that there is something in beauty, in the harmony of shapes and lines, which we are drawn to in a way that is utterly instinctive?
I believe that I am an aesthete and naturally susceptible to what is currently thought of as beauty. Each period has its own standards and I believe that this is necessary to evolution, to define limits that are in turns demolished in order to create new and broader ones. The question of beauty is rooted in our deepest self and it is decisive, in our most primeval sphere, in determining what triggers our desire: the driving engine behind the achievement of everything that requires effort. In my mind, the direction for an artist is the one synonymous with dedication to the search for alternatives to the dominant thoughts in our society while remaining loyal to those same existential questions that have accompanied us since the day of reason – who we are, what is the sense of our lives, where are we going …


I also seem to see an aesthetical evolution between I am Flesh and Human Dilatations. What do you think?
The goals behind I am Flesh and Human Dilatations embrace different journeys. In the first, I wanted to focus the attention on the female physiognomy leading to mapping that can be traced literally inch by inch. They are large format works in which I invite the viewer to visually explore 35 bodies rich in minute details, thereby offering them an almost tactile experience. Young women who, having accepted the challenge of a close-up view of their body, openly bare it to the viewer and, alongside it, offer a contemplation of their life and personal experiences. This is the reason why I opted for a format that entailed a frontal position with the arms behind the head and not in front, which would have symbolized closure and blocking. Every single detail of the body was “acquired” in a photographic manner to then be reassembled, piece by piece, by reinterpreting the original proportions of the owners whilst trying to leave out any potential traces of my own artistic contribution. As most of my investigation, each work is made up of hundreds of photograms assembled together. This method of working serves two goals that are fundamental to me: the first is about ensuring that each work preserves a wealth of photographic information that would be otherwise impossible to obtain; the second is linked to the possibility of creating distortion and heightened perspectives by using a variety of shooting angles and through the way I chose to assemble the photograms. Such distortions were then used to create Human Dilatations – an observation on the contemporary man minus two elements that characterize his quest: physical perfection and the power/role of the mind. Each image represents, as a matter of fact, a body with distorted proportions in some of its parts and that dominates over the head, which wanes without leaving traces behind. Unlike I am Flesh, in Human Dilatations I let my vision take form and guide the creation of this project that I’m still developing and that is, first and foremost, about a way of seeing.


Do you think that the body is in some way the primordial image? Do you think that the body/experience can be represented?
In the body I see the tangible experience of who we are, without which we would only be the mere product of an always moving evolutionary process far from the primordial image. In order to turn it into a physical archetype, I look for a starting point in it, for something primordial towards which my work is constantly moving, moulding the figure until it reveals its essence.


Photography / Focus On / Roger Weiss
MAY 4, 2015 2:30 PM




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RSI, CH





GO TO THE VIDEO






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Ticino Welcome Magazine, CH







VOGLIO SCOPRIRE NUOVI TERRITORI DA ESPLORARE E RACCONTARE


Chi è Roger Weiss?
«Sono nato in Svizzera, il mio approccio alla macchina fotografica è stato immediato ed è avvenuto in giovane età. Mi sono laureato con lode all’Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera. La mia curiosità verso l’essere umano mi ha portato ad approcciarmi ad esso sia artisticamente che come fashion photographer. Ho all’attivo esposizioni e pubblicazioni internazionali».


Quando e come hai deciso di avventurarti nel mondo della fotografia?
«Mi sono legato indissolubilmente alla fotografia durante il primo anno di Accademia, quando mi sono reso conto che avrei potuto usare il mezzo fotografico come una maschera da cui partire per prendere forza e nascondere la mia idea del limite».


Puoi parlarci del tuo lavoro nel corso degli anni?
«I am Flesh è il progetto che mi ha permesso più di altri di esplorare la nostra frammentazione sociale e la mancanza di ritualità, un atto che permette all’uomo di mantenere il giusto equilibrio con il mondo circostante, mantenendo una propria identità. L’iniziazione di un fanciullo all’età adulta di alcune civiltà, conferisce all’atto un valore che segna per sempre la persona al rispetto e alla responsabilità delle proprie azioni. Oggi non c’è più questo elemento fondamentale perché una civiltà mantenga sana la propria posizione. Mangiare carne significa saper uccidere l’animale che si mangia. Senza questo processo, decade ogni altro valore. Le responsabilità e la conoscenza sono volutamente frammentate, settorializzate. Creando così una più facile manipolazione sull’individuo. Non ci sentiamo responsabili di nulla, pur essendolo, poiché ci è permesso di non vedere oltre al nostro atto/frammento. In linea con questo pensiero ho iniziato da poco un nuovo progetto che vi presenterò in anteprima».


Raccontami del progetto Human Dilatations, il progetto sul quale stai lavorando.
«Sì, è ancora in lavorazione e tocca un argomento al quale sono molto sensibile. L’immagine della donna nel nostro tempo e lo schematismo a cui la sua figura è stata ridotta, un insieme di canoni e modelli a cui far risalire la donna/individuo, invece che il contrario.

Human Dilatations non teme i segmenti della cedevolezza del corpo insieme alle sue imperfezioni, ma accompagna l’immagine femminile ad apparire nel suo insieme come una forma altra, in un gioco di distorsioni che permette di rapportarsi all’immagine in modo cangiante, distaccandosi completamente dal gusto stereotipato ed ipocrita del bello. La serie comprenderà diverse opere fotografiche di grande formato che sto definendo con lo studio berneassociati.eu per la stampa ed un vero e proprio gioiello: un libro edito da josefweissedizioni.ch, un unicum stampato ancora a mano su carta pregiata e composto con caratteri mobili. All’interno saranno presenti 3 opere della serie Human Dilatations che accompagneranno il testo del Cantico dei Cantici di Salomone».


Come sei arrivato a questa idea?
«Il mio percorso è nato con l’approcciare all’idea dell’Essere femminile come ad una dimensione che vada oltre al Logos, all’intelligibile, e farlo attraverso la mia visione, quella di un uomo.

Per far ciò non potevo che partire dal Neolitico, il simbolismo della Dea ed il mistero della nascita, morte e rigenerazione. Una ciclicità che è stata rappresentata da tutto un sistema simbolico sopravvissuto per millenni. Prima ancora delle religioni patriarcali.

Ho creato un feeling immediato con la sintesi che ho trovato nelle statuette in osso, pietra o terracotta dell’età della pietra. Sono essenza pura, dense di quelle fragilità della vita e alla continua ricerca dell’uomo di avanzare, che ancora oggi ci rappresentano. Non è cambiato molto nella natura dell’uomo se non, oggi, nella mancanza di quella ritualità che probabilmente conferiva al ciclo della vita una propria dignità».

 
Che ruolo ha l’uomo nel tuo lavoro?
«L’uomo, nel senso di essere umano, è l’ossessione del mio indagare. Prima del nostro conosciuto c’era altro. Prima del patriarcato e del matriarcato, delle ideologie e delle istituzioni, c’era un equilibrio sociale in una continuità matrilineare pronta ad abbracciare l’idea del tutto e della ciclicità della vita. Paradossalmente, oggi, in nome di una forma di “civiltà logica” abbiamo perso la nostra “civiltà umana” che, per amore di un ordine maggiore, di un valore assoluto e definitivo, ci siamo dimenticati l’uomo, che è paradosso dei paradossi l’essere meno assoluto e definitivo del creato, è l’esemplare più “particolare” (nel senso di “è una parte, mai una sintesi ideale”) e “contingente” e in “divenire” che ci sia al mondo».


Che cosa chiedi ai tuoi soggetti di fronte alla macchina fotografica?
«Il mio soggetto/modella sa che, al di là del risultato, ciò che mi interessa è l’incontro in sé, esattamente quando, in pochi istanti, si deve decidere come e quanto di se mettere in gioco. Il resto viene senza forzature».


Hai lavorato sia con la fotografia che con il video, come ti adatti creativamente tra i due mezzi?
«Uso il video come fosse una macchina fotografica, dilatando nel tempo un’immagine costante ed uso la fotografia per cogliere l’attimo, come per un cacciatore con la sua preda. «Si scatta, si spara, si spera di catturare la preda. Il predatore-cacciatore dorme per riposare e sogna per ripassare il proprio saper cacciare. Fotografare è sognare di cacciare, sparare alle prede per poi catturarle davvero il giorno dopo, alla luce del sole. Roger Weiss è come il cacciatore che dipingeva nella camera oscura della caverna la cacciagione affinché la caverna la partorisse là fuori, dove poi lui gli avrebbe dato la caccia alla luce del giorno. Canale del parto, caverna platonica, camera oscura, parete rocciosa, pellicola, supporto digitale… Resta un cacciatore il fotografo, uno strumento di caccia la fotografia; ars goetia, una teurgia il fotografare» (Maurizio Medaglia)».


Come affronti un nuovo progetto quando hai un’idea?
«Ciò che mi circonda diventa un campo di sperimentazione che è alimentato dal desiderio di mettermi in gioco. Sono sempre aperto a mettermi in discussione, cercando di trovare il coraggio di non guardarmi indietro e capire qual è il modo che mi permette di sentirmi in crescita».


Qual è il tuo statement artistico?
«Le società creano e distruggono modelli nell’interesse di pochi. È responsabilità di ognuno di noi cercare e trovare alternative».


Quali sono i tuoi progetti per il futuro?
Lavorare sul concetto di Totem.

Penso allo scultore, quando toglie il superfluo per liberare l’opera/feto contenuta nella materia inanimata, per dargli vita in un vespaio sempre in movimento nel quale viviamo e percepiamo come ci hanno imposto di vedere. Non si sa nulla di ciò che ci circonda ed in questo continuo moto, come lo scultore vede la propria opera prima che nasca, io vedo il feticcio dal quale voglio togliere il superfluo per cercare il mio totem contemporaneo.

Un potente mezzo che porta all’essenza ultima del tutto: paura, soggezione, attrazione (Eros -> vedo VS Thanatos -> non posso toccare), vita, morte, etc.

Il totem crea pensieri e non movimento e rappresenta la totalità intorno alla quale si possono creare riti, racchiudere tutto ciò che le persone possono pensare, desiderare… divenendo così tabù, ed il tabù non si può toccare.

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Blink Magazine, Korea




Hello Roger. Who are you and what do you do for a living?
I was born in Switzerland and in early age I began experimenting with photography.

I graduated with the highest grade from Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan, Italy. My curiosity for the human shape Ieads me to an artistic approach. As up to today, I carry on as an artistic as well as a fashion photographer. I always have thought that photography is a precise lifestyle. A commitment that bears the mark of abnegation, the first condition to approach the sublime. “Photography for a higher awareness of myself, of my human being”.


When and how did you decide to venture into photography?
l’ve been bound to photography since my first year of the Academy of Fine Arts, when I became aware that I could use it as a mask from which to gain strength and hide my idea of limits.
 

Can you talk a bit about some of your work over the years?
I explore our social fragmentation, where each one of us thinks to look out for himself, with no regard for our context. I look for shards of the drama of the human condition to document through photographic fragmentation, that they relate to setbacks and aspirations, weaknesses and strengths, pain and joy. Of rights archieved and rights trodden down.


Tell me about the ‘I am Flesh’ project. How did the idea for the series come about?
Seeing is a pure, primordial, non-Judgmental act; thinking, interpreting and evaluating are subsequent processes arising out of the habit and need of ordering all imagery in our own representation of the world. ‘I am Flesh’ is based precisely on this lack of immediate assessment: by expanding its scope. it creates an experience comparable to that of Iiterary haiku, where – in the absence of lexlcal virtuosity – one has the possibility of following a path through reality.


Who are those people in photographs?
In ‘I am Flesh’ it is bodies who make up reality: 35 naked female bodies metioulously filmed and photcgraphed in their primeval condition to lock as real as possible- and surprisingly so. No distraction is allowed on front of these bodies: in their presence, any feeling of attractionc repugnance, bewilderment, excitement or banal initial curiosity fades away as one gets physically closer to the work, to its outspoken essentiality. These naked bodies act as a stimulus to search new insights in Ioneliness and are like invitations to a confrontation with one’s own self. They reject all pretexts and lies: there is nothing to prove, the evidence is crystal-clear. They are timeless, yet create a space which wrong-foots us. They express the ultimate courage to lay bare and offer onesell without mediaticns – which we almost always lack. We are somehow forced to incarnate in their flesh. And without us being aware of the process, they become maps – and we do the same in a transitive spirit of daring. ‘I am Flesh’ is, above all, a project on identity.


Why did you name the project as ‘I am FIesh’?
‘I am Flesh’ the flesh that exposes itself. calls for others’ perception and the inner self, usually held back as opaque and inaccessible, and becomes open and displayed on the skin so revealing the inner self. These works, rub up against us, create the friction that is typical of the human encounter and call everybody to live a relationship in which reciprocal differences are a pre-condition for understanding.


How was the process of preparing and shoothg for the project?
Friends and models have joined the project as well as all those who simply adhered by seeing the project itself growing. I asked all of them to gift me a moment in which they would have totally released themselves from their life pattern. Only at that moment I would have pictured them in their female being. This extrsordinary resemblance to the truth is achieved by means of a special technique: each image is composed of 47.244 X 32.864 pixels per inch, equivalent to 400 X 278 cm printable area at 300 dpi, while – in order to obtain better perception – the works will be executed as 230 x 160 cm on Diasec and displayed all together.
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Tel me how the idea tor ‘Be Two’ project came about
The ‘Be Two’ is a project on ID through couples Iacking will and pulsions proper of nature’s human soul. By eliminating drives and muscular contraotions, in that very photographic juncture instant I obtained a negative of the instinclual couple and of those reasons why a couple has a right to exist. This negative allowed me to trace a map, an ideal outline in which I can pick elements bonded to the unoonscious and not typical of every human being, elements that crop up afterwards in the images.


What types of people inspire you to take their photogaph?
The encounter with people of passim belongs to that moment in which our sensory receptors are amplified. Photographically speaking I act during this time, when you get closer to each other in dilated pupils. “The pleasure in seeing is spring which feeds summer of a deeper understanding: the possibility TO BE together with the others”.


What do you ask your subjects in front of your camera?
I disguise myselt completely in the pictures machine from where I take the strength from, and I hide my idea of limit in a realty pictured together, in a lonely instant and without mediation. My subject/Models know that Is the meeting in itself that Interests me, exactly when, in a few instants, you have to decide how and how much of yourself you will, and are able to give.


You’ve worked both photography and video, how do you adapt creatively between the two?
I use the video as if it was a camera, expanding in time steady images and I use photography going after a moment that nearly always escapes, like a hunter and his prey. Photography has got to do with hunting. You click, you shoot and you hope you’ve captured your prey. The predator-hunter sleeps to rest and dreams to recounter on his ability to hunt. Photographing is dreaming of hunting, shooting at preys in order to really seize them the day after. At the sunlight the photographer is like the hunter who used to paint in the caves (darkroom) the preys so that the cave could give birth to those preys in the open air where then he would have hunted for them in the daylight. Channel of birth, platonic cave, darkroom, rocky wall, film, digital support… I remain a hunter, photography a mean of hunt; ars goetia, a theurgy the photographing (Maurizio Medaglia).


What equipment do you use?
I use Nikon for photography. Canon for video and Hasselblad for the medium-format.


How do approach a new project when you get an idea?
What surrounds me becomes a field of experimentation which is fed by my desire to get personally involved. I am always questioning myself. Trying to find the courage not to lock back and understand what is the way that allows me to grow.


What is your art theory?
Society creates and destroys models in the interest of a few. Its everyone’s responsibility to find or create alternatives.


What’s next lor you? Any future plans?
Find out new territories to explore and tell about.



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NY Arts magazine, NY



I AM FLESH



“The flesh that exposes itself, calls for others’ perception and the inner self, usually held back as opaque and inaccessible, becomes open and displayed on the skin revealing a self.”




Our society creates and destroys models in the interest of a few. It is everyone’s responsibility to find or create alternatives.


I am inspired when I encounter passionate people who possess the ability to belong to the moment in which our sensory receptors are amplified. Photographically speaking, this is the moment when I act: when pupils dilate and I can get closer to my subject.


In “I Am Flesh,” I look for shards of the drama of the human condition to document through videos and photos; they relate setbacks and aspirations, weaknesses and strengths, pain and joy, rights achieved, and rights trodden down.


The flesh that exposes itself, calls for others’ perception and the inner self, usually held back as opaque and inaccessible, becomes open and displayed on the skin revealing a self. These works rub up against us, creating the friction that is typical of the human encounter.


Every body calls us to live a relationship in which reciprocal differences are preconditions for understanding. In “I Am Flesh,” bodies constitute reality: 35 naked bodies are filmed and photographed in their primeval condition to look as real as possible.


I have chosen women, and not bodies or organisms. Bodies in photography are bodies seen—in cinema, also heard— but they are certainly not bodies that can be touched. In short, they are bodies that keep their distance.


Seen as inert. Dead. From a phenomenological point of view, there is the distinction between Körper (“body”) and Leib (“belly”). The first term signifies the objective body, to be seen in terms of anatomy and of physiology (and also of pornography).


The second term signifies the body as lived in and experienced in real life. If the human condition were merely to “live,” it could be summed up in the working of the body’s organs.


Accordingly, we would see pictures of bodies “looking good” and “functioning well,” or, alternatively, emaciated and sickly bodies. But, as the human condition entails “existence,” the body takes on a psychological tonality.


Thus, the personality makes its presence known in the world; everyone communicates, interacts with, and relates to his or her fellows. “I Am Flesh“ is Leib—a piece that seeks to show the body’s feeling, immersing us in the body as it is seen.

13

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Twill magazine, FR 





35 AN ETHMOGRAPHIC PROJECT 



In I am Flesh bodies make up reality: 35 naked female bodies meticulously photographed in their primeval condition to look as real as possibile – and surprisingly so.

This extraordinary resemblance to the truth is achieved by means of a special technique whereby each image is composed of 47,244 x 32,864 pixels per inch, equivalent to 400 X 278 cm printable area at 300 dpi, while,for reasons of better perception, the final prints will be executed as 230 x 160 cm True Giclée Fine Art Prints, protected under plexiglass and displayed all together.



Human bodies have long been photographed and described. Many have been seen and read about. And every community, through its institutions and leaders, has always espoused certain body-types and shunned others. Showing off the desirable ones, and hiding the undesirable. All those who might be perceived as excessive or upsetting. Roger Weiss, donning the role of a visual ethnographer, involves himself in every body-type of contemporary society. Almost adopting a “naturalistic” approach, he isn’t scared to get his hands dirty. To breathe somebody else’s breath. Accepting that our own images are never fully under control. Rather, he allows them a certain margin, opening up ever-changing and unlooked for perceptions. And with project 35, he invites us to continually switch between the general and the particular, setting in motion a systematic alternation between interior and exterior. He undermines the comforting idea of an established aesthetic of anatomy and takes us on a journey of the body that turns its revelations of intimacy into an exercise of democracy.

The essence of human rights, a key element for any society to call itself democratic, is that the autonomy of the individual rests on the inviolability of the human body. The body, that in past ages was in the hands of God and the ruler. In war, sent to the slaughterhouse by the generals. In the fields and in the factories, abused and deceived by the cheating bosses. Today, instead, our bodies belong to us. Admittedly, even under democracy, politics retain some control over our bodies. Always ready to regulate, to forbid and to issue permits. And yet, political control struggles with bodies reluctant to hand over control of their own fate. There are plenty of scenarios for control – and plenty of dilemmas – from procreation to living wills.

One of these scenarios relates to the expressive materialization of the self in the appearance of the body, in the visible identity of the individual. This is the drift of Roger Weiss’ argument.

As phenomenology shows, if the self exists in the world via the body, it can be experienced in two different ways: objectively and a subjectively. Bodies that by their functioning test the limits of their own reality. Shards of the drama of the human condition. In daily life, the body is the self, the dwelling place of my feelings, where I move, the frame for my perspectives. And I can even adopt a perspective of examining my own body. But there are innumerable social occasions where a separation exists between the self and the body. Medical discourse, for example, with its ability to turn a person into a patient. Or, at its most extreme, into a corpse. On which one can operate without any resistance. But even then, the self remains, as it were, trapped. Because not only do I have a body, I am a body.

And, today, living as we do in a body-crazed society, individuals are always being called on to “work on” or “look after” their bodies. And if individuals know what they can do – within certain limits – with their own bodies, the problem remains what to do with this freedom, because the body expresses an established rapport with the surrounding world. Thus becoming an existential option. A topical theme for contemporary democracies.

Roger Weiss’ photographs are life forms that speak by means of the body and not about the body. They relate setbacks and aspirations, weaknesses and strengths, pain and joy. Of rights achieved and rights trodden down. The flesh that exposes itself, calls for others’ perception. Obliging these perceptions to pause on its appearance. A place where the self and the world intermingle and relegate the realm of ideas to second place in order to deal with the realm of the visible. The inner self, usually held back as opaque and inaccessible, becomes open and displayed on the skin. So, it’s not about somebody else’s body that conceals a self. Rather, it’s about bodies that reveal a self. And, being able to follow every fold, it is possible to feel emotions that become stories. Moments that become history. The photographer, just as he enlarges faces, expands the feelings experienced. In other words, he enables us to “reach within”, putting people in touch with themselves and others.

And thus, these oversize photographs rub up against us, creating the friction that is typical of the human encounter. Every body, though forming and representing defined individuality, is turned outside itself, and is set in a relationship. Not an absorbing empathy but rather an invitation to live a relationship of differences. In which reciprocal differences are a pre-condition for understanding. That is project 35; that is what democracy should be about!


TEXT by Adriano Zamperini
Translated by Bob Lowe and Marco Sonzogni







... on the web 








Hoboh
Febbraio 2018

Roger Weiss e l’espressione del corpo


HUMAN DILATATIONS, L’IMPRESSIONANTE SERIE FOTOGRAFICA DELLO SVIZZERO ROGER WEISS.
Ispirandosi al Kinstugi, tecnica di restauro giapponese che utilizza l’oro per colmare le crepe, il fotografo distorce il corpo delle sue modelle allungandone le forme con una tensione espressionista.

IMMORTALATI I SOGGETTI DA DIVERSE PROSPETTIVE NE RICOSTRUISCE LE FORME ASSEMBLANDO CENTINAIA DI SCATTI DAL TRATTO DELICATO E UNIFORME.

I corpi, dilatati e distorti spingono lo spettatore verso un’analisi millimetrica del corpo femminile. Weiss si concentra anche sulle imperfezioni, anche loro parte della nuova estetica del corpo dell’era moderna. La disumanizzazione e la mercificazione delle donne appartengono a uno specifico patrimonio culturale, che è difficile sradicare […]

LA MIA SFIDA È CERCARE L’ESSENZA DELL’ESSERE FEMMINILE IN UNA DIMENSIONE CHE VA OLTRE IL LOGOS.




DesignTaxi
By Yoon Sann Wong, 09 May 2017

NSFW Photo Series Offers Refreshing, Unique Perspectives On The Female Form


Every day, millions of people are surrounded by imagery depicting the ideal notion of female beauty. Spurred by his growing dissociation from such picture-perfect but unrealistic images, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss took to developing ‘Human Dilatations’–a photo series that celebrates the curves and flaws that make people human. He does this by pushing the physical form via distortion, thus challenging the exaggerated beauty ideals that have become so commonplace in society today.
‘Kintsugi’–a Japanese reparation technique that uses gold to fill cracks in broken pottery–inspires his work. Weiss disintegrates his subjects into numerous images, captured from various perspectives, before assembling them into a whole.
The photographer explains on his website, “My path began with the approach of the image of women of our times has been reduced to a pattern, a combination of codes and models that lead to the woman [or] individual instead of the other way around.”
“‘Human Dilatations’ does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.”




stern.de - NEON
Von Refinery29-Autorin Insa Grüning 21. Dezember 2017 20:00 Uhr
Politische Fotografie

Diese starken Bilder kritisieren die mediale Darstellung des weiblichen Körpers


Fotograf Roger Weiss hinterfragt in seiner Fotoserie "Human Dilatations" die visuelle Inszenierung des weiblichen Körpers. Dessen Darstellung in den Massenmedien beruht meist auf den immer gleichen Codes und standardisierten Posen.

Von Refinery29-Autorin Insa Grüning

Vornehmlich werden medial, nach wie vor, sehr schlanke und vor allem junge Frauen repräsentiert, deren makellose und straffe Körper in Magazinen und auf Werbeplakaten zu sehen sind. Der Schweizer Fotograf Roger Weiss hat sich diesen. seiner Meinung nach äußerst reduzierten. und längst überholten Repräsentationsweisen angenommen und hinterfragt in seiner Fotoserie "Human Dilatations" die visuelle Inszenierung des weiblichen Körpers.
Weiss bemängelt, dass von den meisten medialen Bildern, die uns heutzutage permanent umgeben, nur noch wenig Menschlichkeit ausgehe. Menschlichkeit bedeute, gerade die Mängel, Makel und Narben eines Menschen nicht auszuschneiden oder zu übergehen, sondern anzunehmen. Genau darum geht es Weiss in seinen Arbeiten, in denen er die sogenannten Imperfektionen, die man der Schönheit zu Liebe gern wegretuschiert, oder versteckt, gezielt und ganz bewusst in den Fokus rückt.
Roger Weiss: "Fehlerhaftigkeit sichtbar machen”
Um die Makel in aller Deutlichkeit zu zeigen, setzt Weiss in seinen Arbeiten auf eine experimentelle Collage-Technik, die zu ungewohnten Verzerrungen führt. Zunächst lichtet er seine Modelle aus allen erdenklichen Perspektiven ab, um die Fotos danach in hunderte Fragmente zu zerlegen und anschließend wieder zusammenzufügen. Das Resultat sind extreme Verzerrungen und ungewohnte Perspektiven, die mit idealisierten Körpervorstellungen brechen und die Betrachter erfahrungsgemäß schockieren, da sie mit einer ungewohnten Menge an Menschlichkeit konfrontiert werden – sehr frontal, nah und direkt.
Seine Herangehensweise ist an die traditionelle, aber immer noch populäre, japanische Methode "Kintsugi" angelehnt, mit der man Bruchstellen an Keramik und Porzellan repariert. Die Klebestellen bleiben auch im Nachhinein durch charakteristische Dekorationseffekte sichtbar – so wie auch bei Weiss' Fotografien. Dennoch schafft Roger Weiss in seinen Arbeiten eine fast schon hyperrealistische Schönheit, die den Betrachter fesselt.




mirtesen.ru
23.11.2016 в 12:00

Женщина безобразная, или что творится в голове швейцарского фотографа


28 фото обнаженных женщин под эффектом диспропорции. Необычный взгляд на тело человека, которое словно подверглось дилатации, правда фокусной, временно визуальной. Фотограф из Швейцарии Роджер Вайс (Roger Weiss) стремится к тому, чтобы не просто скрыть недостатки женской фигуры, а наоборот, он хочет именно подчеркнуть несовершенство тела в полной мере.

Такие непривычные глазу, непропорциональные фотоснимки вызывают в зрителе, скорее всего, некоторую оторопь, граничащую с отвращением. Однако понимание того факта, что это просто вопрос ракурса съемки и субъективного восприятия красоты, способно заставить некоторых людей посмотреть на работы креативного мастера несколько иначе. Посмотрим, удастся ли получить такое впечатление, и понравятся ли эти работы русским женщинам :)...

Вызывающий проект швейцарца получил название "Расширения человека" ("Human Dilatations"), имеет несколько направлений, определенных автором как: Human Dilatations Suspension, Human Dilatations Monoliths и Human Dilatations Compositions, и его цель – обратить внимание на два аспекта жизни современного человека, которыми тот руководствуется в своих решениях: физическое совершенство и реальное состояние силы его разума. Каждый студийный снимок показывает искаженное тело, в котором его нижняя часть выглядит существенно больше, чем голова, словно подчеркивая животное происхождение Homo sapiens. "Это как фрагменты человеческой трагедии. Я запечатлеваю чаяния, слабости, сильные стороны, боль, радость – то, что есть у человека, и то, что у него отняли", – комментирует Роджер Вайс.

Источник

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FZN
Frédéric Pereira 11 mai, 2017 at 22:18
PHOTOGRAPHIE

HUMAN DILATATIONS : DES PHOTOS NSFW POUR CÉLÉBRER LA BEAUTÉ DES FEMMES


Roger Weiss a présenté une nouvelle collection de photos, une collection baptisée « Human Dilatations ». Elle offre un point de vue unique sur la beauté féminine, le tout au travers de photos totalement inédites.

Originaire de Suisse, Roger Weiss s’est intéressé dès l’enfance à la photographie et il a rapidement compris qu’il devait en faire son métier. Après ses études secondaires, il a donc suivi un cursus complet à l’Académie des Beaux-Arts de Brera à Milan, en Italie.

Il a alors été récompensé d’un diplôme avec une mention d’excellence.

Human Dilatations, des corps déformés et sublimés par l’œil du photographe

Riche de cette expérience, il a ensuite décidé de voler de ses propres ailes et de se focaliser sur son art.

Roger s’est donc lancé dans plusieurs projets personnels et ces derniers ont rencontré un franc succès auprès de la critique. Ils lui ont aussi ouvert les portes des salles d’exposition à plusieurs reprises et certaines de ces photos ont même été reprises dans les revues d’art.

Cette émulsion lui a également permis de trouver un éditeur. Il a publié trois livres en l’espace de quelques années et « Human Dilatations » est précisément l’un d’entre eux.

Comme il l’explique lui-même sur son site, pour cette collection, Roger s’est donné pour mission de rechercher « l’essence de l’être féminin dans une dimension qui va au-delà des logos et à travers sa vision ». Pour réaliser ces photos stupéfiantes, il s’est donc inspiré d’une technique japonaise, le Kintsugi. Peu connue du grand public, elle est apparue à la fin du XVe siècle et elle consiste à réparer des porcelaines ou des céramiques brisées avec une laque saupoudrée de poudre d’or.

Une technique inspirée du Kintsugi

Contrairement aux techniques habituelles, elle n’a pas pour but de masquer les dégâts infligés à un objet, mais plutôt de les mettre en avant en soulignant leurs aspérités avec de l’or.

Roger a donc sélectionné plusieurs modèles et il a pris plusieurs centaines de photos à différents angles. Il les a ensuite fragmentées et il les a réassemblées pour créer des images aux proportions irréalistes.

Bien sûr, pour arriver à ce résultat, le photographe a dû passer plusieurs heures à sélectionner les bons fragments pour conserver une cohérence au niveau du teint de la peau et de la lumière. Certaines de ces photos ont ainsi nécessité plus d’une dizaine d’heures de travail.

Cette sélection n’est pas exhaustive. Une partie de la collection est dispo ici.




Refinery29
INSA GRÜNING, 21. SEPTEMBER 2017, 21:08

Diese starken Bilder kritisieren die mediale Darstellung des weiblichen Körpers


Die Darstellung des weiblichen Körpers in den Massenmedien beruhte in den letzten Jahrzehnten weitestgehend auf den immer gleichen Codes und standardisierten Posen – wobei natürlich auch hier Ausnahmen die Regel bestätigen. Trotzdem: Vornehmlich werden nach wie vor sehr schlanke und vor allem junge Frauen repräsentiert, deren makellose und straffe Körper in Magazinen und auf Werbeplakaten zu sehen sind. Der Schweizer Fotograf Roger Weiss hat sich diesen seiner Meinung nach äußerst reduzierten und längst überholten Repräsentationsweisen angenommen und hinterfragt in seiner Fotoserie Human Dilatations die visuelle Inszenierung des weiblichen Körpers.

Die mediale Repräsentation des weiblichen Körpers hinterfragen

Weiss bemängelt, dass von den meisten medialen Bildern, die uns heutzutage permanent umgeben, nur noch wenig Menschlichkeit ausgehe. Menschlichkeit, das bedeute auch, gerade die Mängel, Makel und Narben eines Menschen nicht auszuschneiden oder zu übergehen, sondern anzusehen. Und genau darum geht es Weiss auch in seinen Arbeiten, in denen er die sogenannten Imperfektionen, die man der Schönheit zu Liebe gerne wegretuschiert oder versteckt, gezielt und ganz bewusst in den Fokus rückt.

Fehlerhaftigkeit sichtbar machen

Um die Makel in aller Deutlichkeit zu zeigen, setzt Weiss in seinen Arbeiten auf eine experimentelle Collage-Technik, die zu ungewohnten Verzerrungen führt. Zunächst lichtet er seine Modelle aus allen erdenklichen Perspektiven ab, um die Fotos danach in hunderte Fragmente zu zerlegen und anschließend wieder zusammenzufügen. Das Endresultat: Extreme Verzerrungen und ungewohnte Perspektiven, die mit idealisierten Körpervorstellungen brechen und die Betrachter erfahrungsgemäß schockieren, weil sie mit einer ungewohnten Menge Menschlichkeit konfrontiert werden – sehr frontal, nah und direkt.

Seine Herangehensweise ist an die traditionelle, aber immer noch populäre japanische Methode namens Kintsugi angelehnt, mit der man Bruchstellen an Keramik und Porzellan repariert. Die Klebestellen bleiben auch im Nachhinein durch charakteristische Dekorationseffekte sichtbar – so wie auch in Weiss' Fotografien. Und dennoch schafft Roger Weiss in seinen Arbeiten eine fast schon hyperrealistische Schönheit, die den Betrachter fesselt.

Wir zeigen eine Auswahl seiner Werke aus der Serie Human Dilatations in der Slideshow:




artsupermagazine.com
01.02.2018

ROGER WEISS | EATING : THE ACT OF CONFIDENCE


Roger Weiss was born in Switzerland and began experimenting with photography from an early age. Graduated with Mention of Excellence from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan (Italy). His curiosity for the expressions of humankind open him the path to an artistic approach. He performs as an artist, art director as well as a fashion photographer. Observing the body, its possibilities, its personal victories and its concealed baggages, Roger Weiss analyzed, by a new way to use the photographic medium in which the obsession with cataloguing, repetition, and decomposition build a disturbing and full of details sight of the human body. This interview is a new step in the poetic of the artist through the investigation of the body and its aspects. Through the use of a new media: the video, Roger Weiss try to investigate even more in depth the feelings that the body reveal through his actions and movements during the process of feeding.

A.S. Why a topic related to food and eating?

R.W. Man is a being capable of inventing stories, postulates holding up the entire world as we know it. Behind every human being there is an incredible “architecture”, consisting of “bricks” or items such as knowledge, prejudices, experiences, habits, indoctrination, education, and so on. A vessel that, with time, we structure more and more, until becoming the fortress. The food, the act of eating, creates a spontaneous passage that can allow to get around these fortifications and get past the mask.

Actually, eating is a basic practice derived from the instinct of survival. The act itself is the merging point between two dimensions constantly connected with each other: the deepest one – our innermost and mysterious side –  and the external structure well known to all, where sounds, the eyes followed by the mouth, the tongue and the nerve endings translate into the so-called nourishment process. A development that occurs through an unconditional act of confidence that reveals itself in one the greatest human related moments of intimacy: eating. An act of will which allows lowering our defences to favour communication and the transition from what is external and foreign towards the most inner and private part of our body. In other words, this process generates life itself.

A.S. How do you think you can connect videos with your poetics always linked to the photographic medium? What kind of differences have you noticed?

R.W. Archivi Intimi  brings together private moments through a collection of videos created in my studio during the break between a photo session and the other. I face the video like a photograph in motion, a still image, by adding the element of sound. I have replaced the research of the detail, its my way of capturing images, with a microphone that let me to pick up amplified vibrations produced by the act of eating. Inserting in the image in the end, they create a real timeline.

A.S. What is your feelings observing the videos? What differences and what similarities among the subjects?

R.W. How much can be natural and spontaneous a person who is asked to eat in front of a camera? I am convinced that no matter the degree of spontaneity but only the repetition of an act; through endless attempts you can arrive at a relevant synthesis  in which there are authentic glimpse. What I try to do is to offer an opportunity to catch them.

A.S. What is your relationship with food and what’s your feeling about being observed?

R.W. I am very bashful but I like to observe others. I eat thinking that am gonna choose better the next day. I swallow most of the food without consciousness, for example products that I don’t know so well. I guess I can be more aware day by day and with time, create a more profound consciousness.




objectsmag.it
15.02.2018

La bellezza femminile nelle distorsioni prospettiche di Roger Weiss


Human Dilatations, la particolare ed impressionante serie fotografica del fotografo svizzero Roger Weiss.

Una nuova forma di rappresentazione della bellezza femminile lontana da quella stereotipata dei giorni nostri.

Ispirato dalla tecnica giapponese Kintsugi (tecnica di riparazione che utilizza l’oro per riempire le crepe), Weiss cattura e ricostruisce i suoi soggetti assemblando centinaia di scatti da diverse prospettive, così garantendo che ogni sfaccettatura del modello sia messa a fuoco.

Ogni scatto cattura un corpo leggermente dilatato e distorto, con una conseguente analisi dettagliata di ogni parte. L’intera serie esplora nuove prospettive di bellezza femminile, abbracciando quelle “imperfezioni” che hanno portato esagerati stereotipi di bellezza all’interno della società moderna.

La disumanizzazione e la mercificazione delle donne appartengono a uno specifico patrimonio culturale, che è difficile sradicare […] La mia sfida è cercare l’essenza dell’essere femminile in una dimensione che va oltre il logos.

-Roger Weiss





boredpanda.com
By Greta J.

NSFW Photo Series Explores The Beauty Of Female Body From A Never-Seen-Before Perspective


Photographer Roger Weiss was finding himself increasingly disassociating with the photographs depicting women, so he set out to capture the female form in a different way.

Inspired by Kintsugi, a Japanese method for repairing broken things by filling gold in the cracks, Weiss' series called “Human Dilatations” features 250 unifying photographs that show how the female body is fragmented and then reassembled. Each photo in the series captures a body that is slightly dilated and distorted, resulting in a detailed analysis of every part of the female body. The whole series explores new perspectives of female beauty.

More info: Human Dilatations (h/t: dazeddigital)





schoenhaesslich.de
Published on August 3, 2016 // By Pierre

DIE AUSDEHNUNG DES MENSCHLICHEN KÖRPERS


Mensch, Fleisch, Haut, Form. Genau damit beschäftigt sich der schweizer Fotograf Roger Weiss. In seiner Serie Human Dilatations_Monoliths betrachtet er den menschlichen Körper in Nahaufnahme und lichtet ihn auch so ab.

Mit kleinen gelben Punkten markiert er bei den Models die Punkte, die er später in Photoshop wieder zusammensetzt und das in einer gnadenlos hohen Auflösung. Jede Bildkomposition besteht am Ende aus über 200 Bildern, was zu einer unglaublichen Detailtreue führt.

Ausgehend von dieser riesigen Bildvorlage spielt der Fotograf mit der Formgebung des Körpers und kann unwirkliche Perspektiven schaffen, die mit einer Kamera so nur schwer möglich wären.





klonblog.com
Von Natalie Baumgärtner - 6. Januar 2019

Roger Weiss studiert die Form des Weiblichen


Roger Weiss will mit seinen Bildern keine Perfektion abbilden, eher möchte er dem genauen Gegenteil huldigen. Die überaus spannenden Aktaufnahmen des Schweizer Fotokünstlers sind inspiriert von der japanischen Reparaturtechnik Kintsugi. Mit ihr gibt man zerbrochenen Keramikgefäßen sowohl ein zweites Leben als auch ein ganz besonderes Aussehen. Diese Art der Neuschaffung und des Perspektivwechsels von der perfekten Unversehrtheit hin zur Schönheit von Brüchen lässt sich offensichtlich hervorragend auf Rogers Anliegen beziehen.

His curiosity for the expressions of humankind open him the path to an artistic approach. Today, he performs as an artist, art director as well as a fashion photographer.“

„Eine Studie der weiblichen Form“ bezeichnet er seine Serie „Human Dilatations“ , für die er für jedes Motiv jeweils Hunderte von Bildern übereinander gelegt hat. Die ungewöhnlichen Dimensionen fesseln den Blick und machen den Betrachter neugierig darauf, die abgebildeten Körper genauestens zu studieren. Auf Rogers Website kann man viele weitere interessante Körperstudien entdecken.





museemagazine.com
By Karolina Sotomayor, 11.07.2016

Human Dilatations at Roger Weiss


What happens when the female body is devoid of the concern for perfection, when it’s finally free from the pressure of reaching the high standards of beauty it has been confined to?

These are the questions that have inspired the works of Swiss artist and fashion photographer Roger Weiss. “Human Dilatations” is not just a series of nude female bodies, it moves beyond the physicality of beauty into the essence of femininity as a whole and what it stands for in a contemporary context.  

The series is particularly interesting considering that the male gaze has been highly criticized for having the strongest and often only voice in defining female beauty in art throughout history. Weiss, however, uses his masculinity as an opportunity to pursue a deeper understanding of the female body detached from the stereotypes that define beauty in today’s world.

The images present seemingly otherworldly women, with large feet and hands. Gigantic bodies stand strong, almost undefeatable yet they still emanate a softness and airiness that characterizes femininity. The idea that women are fragile beings is completely disregarded by the photographer to the point where the slightest grime and scratch is only an indicator of the humanity women are often encouraged to cover up. It is the imperfections, therefore, that make every woman portrayed by Weiss unique. In their own nudity, Weiss’ subjects seem to have found an identity that allows them and us, in equal measure, to overcome the obstacles of being a woman today.





http://la-pause.net
Par Camille à 23:02, 20.06.2016 | Édition, Graphique, Photographie, Photographie

LES CORPS DILATÉS DE ROGER WEISS


Les corps sont déformés, démesurés. Ses femmes deviennent les objets de fantasmes, mais de fantasmes dérangeant, inavoués, qui ne veulent pas de corps parfaits. Roger Weiss délivre le portrait de femmes ordinaires qui ne le sont plus sous son objectif. Quand on y cherche du sens, on le trouve vite.

Robert Weiss est un photographe suisse. Il a étudié à l’Académie di Brera à Milan. Son travail est principalement orienté vers les corps et leur démesure, leur beauté dans leur disgrâce.

Son travail sur ‘Human Dilatation’ n’est pas une exception. Il y met en premier plan des parties du corps souvent laissées pour compte dans le travail photographique ou au contraire, sur-exploitées mais enfermées dans les carcans de nos stéréotypes. C’est à partir de cette idée que commence le travail de Roger Weiss, lui-même médusé des stéréotypes qu’il peut appliquer aux femmes. Tous ces codes selon les quels une femme se définie : des jambes longues, une taille fine… Tout un tas d’idées préconçue partant des parties les plus visibles (les pieds, les mains) aux parties les plus intimes (la forme de doivent avoir les lèvres inférieures). Toutes ces membres qui nous font nous, en temps que femme unique, que l’on aimerait pouvoir quantifier (une taille 36) et comparer (des hanches plus fines, des seins plus gros), sont, dans le travail de Roger Weiss, complètement démesurés, grâce à une technique de découpe puis de collage.

Ce travail, aussi intéressant soit-il est surtout très en lien avec notre époque. Si la femme a toujours été objet de discussion, autant sur son corps que sur les “critères” qu’elle doit remplir, elle est, aujourd’hui, au coeur de discussion qui vont justement à l’encontre de tous ces stéréotypes. A l’heure où le monde du mannequinat s’emploie de plus en plus à embaucher des mannequins représentatifs de la diversité humaine (trisomiques, albinos ou encore atteints de maladie de peau), à l’heure où les gouvernements doivent encore légiférer sur la maigreur des mannequins, à l’heure où des femmes sont encore attaquées sur leur physique non-conventionnel, à l’heure où la femme est encore un objet plutôt qu’une personne, son travail résonne et interpèle.





orlandoweekly.com
By OW Staff, Thursday, 23.06.2016 Kate DiCamillo

Selections: Our picks of the week's best events, June 22-28


The photographs in this frankly amazing group show at Snap Space hearken back to a time before Photoshop, when creating visual effects was an art of the eye and the lens, although some of these works do use modern technology to achieve their aims. The Dilatations series by Roger Weiss (above) fragments and reassembles hundreds of photographs of each subject into something monolithic and frighteningly beautiful, abstracting them into hypermodern Venuses. Jörg Heidenberger's images, as shockingly distorted as they are – it's almost difficult to visually reassemble the human body in the portraits – seem to use only perspective to achieve maximum impact. Photos by Marwane Pallas and Nicolas Senegas and paintings by Cristina Troufa are lighter, cheekier, with more humor and decorative aesthetics, while David Catá's embroidered portraits – sewn directly into his skin – offer a grimmer sort of humor, an acknowledgment of the beauty but also pain of love, and the marks and sometimes scars it makes on those who dare to commit. – Jessica Bryce Young






buzzporn.net

Human Dilatations de Roger Weiss


Montrer des corps dénudés est toujours un challenge difficile pour un photographe. Le suisse Roger Weiss propose un angle assez différent de ce que l’on a pu déjà voir. La série de photos « Human Dilatations » va un peu plus loin dans l’exercice avec des prises de vue assez étonnantes.

Alors qu’il exerce également dans la mode, Roger Weiss montre ici une autre facette de son talent avec ces clichés surprenants qui s’éloignent réellement de son autre activité. Ici, les corps sont montrés de manière distordue et les prises de vue se placent de manière inattendue. L’artiste nous montre des modèles, souvent nues, sous un nouveau jour et il faut avouer que le résultat est plutôt original. Le corps humain semble comme déformé par l’objectif. Une vraie curiosité artistique qu’on a beaucoup apprécié.

[CETTE SÉRIE DE PHOTOS] NE CRAINT PAS LES MARQUES DE LA FRAGILITÉ DU CORPS ET SES IMPERFECTIONS MAIS ENCOURAGE PLUTÔT L’IMAGE FÉMININE À APPARAÎTRE DANS SON ENSEMBLE : UNE FORME PAR ELLE-MÊME, DANS UN JEU DE DISTORSIONS QUI PERMET DE SE POSITIONNER DIFFÉREMMENT À L’IMAGE, ENTIÈREMENT DÉTACHÉ DES STÉRÉOTYPES ET LA NOTION HYPOCRITE DE LA BEAUTÉ.

Un concept qui s’affranchi des codes de « la beauté standardisée » en ne respectant aucune proportion. Là où les modèles dans la mode sont mesurées sous toutes les coutures, ici, l’idée est justement de casser cette image de la femme en jouant avec des échelles improbables. Roger Weiss s’est rapidement fait remarqué dans le milieu de la photo avec ces clichés qui apportent enfin un peu de fraîcheur et de nouveauté dans le nu.

On vous invite chaudement à aller découvrir son travail.






utopianmagazine.com
JULY 9, 2016 BY UTOPIAN

These photographs explore new perspectives of female beauty


Inspired by ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi, photographer Roger Weiss pieces together hundreds of photograph fragments to break down beauty ideals

After finding himself increasingly disassociating with imagery depicting the female form and viewing anatomy as devoid of all meaning, reduced to a set of codes and combinations as opposed to the curves and flaws that make us human, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss became increasingly frustrated with the lack of humanity throughout imagery that represents what makes us human.

Aiming to expose the lack of meaning in our contemporary visual representations of the female body, his series “Human Dilatations” (which originally appeared on Fotografia) aims to remove this indifference, pushing our physical forms to the extreme through distortion, embracing the so-called ‘imperfections’ that have lead to our exaggerated beauty ideals within modern society. Inspired by Kintsugi, (a Japanese reparation technique that uses gold to fill cracks), Weiss fragments his subjects into multiple images – assembling hundreds of fragments of photographs of the same subject that are taken from different perspectives to ensure every facet of the model is depicted in focus. Below we sit down with the photographer to discuss hypocritical beauty, aesthetic functions and the woman as a modern day totem.

When did you first pick up a camera?

Roger Weiss: My first camera was a black Nikkormat that my father gave me for a photography class at school. I immediately felt a sense of freedom linked to the object itself and to the idea that through this box I would be able to better understand my own thoughts by putting it down on paper. However, after producing the first prints I was so disappointed that I abandoned it and only resumed using it many years later at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts.

How did you get the idea for “Human Dilatations”, and what is the series all about?

Roger Weiss: Modern life is rooted in a telematics dimension of which the head has become the undisputed symbol, and the body is superfluous unless it is so perfect that it can be put on display to perform an aesthetic function alone. “Human Dilatations” eliminates these two elements to show us a body with parts of exasperated proportions and a head that wanes without trace, to create a rift between the vulnerability of the human and the two pillars that distinguish the contemporary man: physical perfection and the power/role of the mind.

What inspires you so much about the female figure?

Roger Weiss: The comparison with women, my companion piece, originates from the desire to nurture a personal awareness that becomes wider and richer each time, through a dialectic vision. In this process, photography is the medium that more than any other allows me to log details that would otherwise get lost. In the beginning, it was all about storing information that I freely acquired, letting the subject become a hero of himself. Nowadays, through a more structured work, I try to go beyond one’s own identity.

Thereby changing it to a figure that can be ascribed to all women and none in particular. In “Human Dilatations”, I gave substance to my vision of the woman while maintaining a certain level of detachment from the beauty stereotypes of our times. Initially, I drew inspiration from primordial figures like the Venus figurines dating back to the Palaeolithic period and their symbolic meaning, to then initiate a broader and freer journey, which I embarked on in search for my idea of perfection – my contemporary totem.

“Each period has its own standards and I believe that this is necessary to evolution, to define limits that are in turns demolished in order to create new and broader ones” – Roger Weiss

You’ve previously mentioned the idea of the modern totem- how does the idea of this come into play throughout the series?

Roger Weiss: My work is based on transformation. I change from the individual to shapes which do not only represent their group but are more the container of our feelings formed by taboos – the most ancient prohibitions – by desire, and by fears as if they are embodied in a totem and its laws. There are two ways of creating: the first is to eliminate the superfluous to free the work of art that is contained in the raw material, the second is to add to the raw material until we reach to the limit that we imposed upon ourselves. Like a sculptor, I have found in the woman the raw material from which I have eliminated what I considered unnecessary to extract my modern totem. The totem forges thoughts and represents the whole around which rituals can be created.  It encloses everything that people can think or desire, it represents the relationships between men and women, thus becoming a taboo. A taboo with its most ancient prohibitions, which remains intact because it may not be touched.

Do you wish for the series to make a wider comment on the way we view the female body as a society?

Roger Weiss: Everyone is responsible for what they spread. In my case I give form to, and reveal, my images. Everything that this entails is subject to who decides to confront it, and to what extent they do so. My wish is to be able to transmit my signal, among the infinite existing ones, that may provide an additional basis for reflection.

Why do you choose to create short films to accompany the series?

Roger Weiss: One of the challenges I encounter in my work is how to display pieces that should be enjoyed in real life on the internet. They are loaded with information and are designed for large-scale viewing. That is why I have decided to create short videos that enable the viewer to approach the detail and perceive the otherwise hidden nature.

You’ve said desire is important to your practise, but how does this manifest itself in your imagery?

Roger Weiss: I believe that I am an aesthete and naturally susceptible to what is currently thought of as beauty. Each period has its own standards and I believe that this is necessary to evolution, to define limits that are in turns demolished in order to create new and broader ones. The question of beauty is is rooted in our deepest self, in our most primeval sphere – in determining what triggers our desire: the driving engine behind the achievement of everything that requires effort. In my mind, the direction for an artist is the one synonymous with dedication to the search for alternatives to the dominant thoughts in our society while remaining loyal to those same existential questions that have accompanied us since the day of reason – who we are, what is the sense of our lives, where are we going.

“The dehumanisation and commodification of women belongs to a specific cultural heritage, which is difficult to eradicate”– Roger Weiss

How do we move away from sexual objectification of the female form?

Roger Weiss: The dehumanisation and commodification of women belongs to a specific cultural heritage, which is difficult to eradicate. Though one cannot give up such a position from one day to the next I still believe that, even in their smallness, great things may gradually change. Breaking these cycles that take us rationally back to before the experience took place could be the first step to create new scales of values. Before the image of the woman as an object I have placed my wish to create images that are born from the incompleteness with which men share their lives. I focused on the reinterpretation of the body through the assistance of perspectives and distortions for which we have less experience, and through the obsessive collection of hidden information that is related to the photographic detail of the captured surface. From this process I have created a rift between what we know through our daily stereotype-based experience, and things against which we build defences

View more of Roger Weiss’s work here. Weiss has a show in Orlando at Snap! Space on 24 June, click here for more information

This video below was made over 14 hours and shows the process of creating Weiss’s works






licencedartiste.com

COLLAGES EN HD


Roger Weiss est né en Suisse. Il photographie le corps de ses modèles partie par partie pour ensuite le reconstituer à l’ordinateur en haute définition.

Weiss s’approche de son sujet pour en magnifier les détails. Il tente de montrer le corps comme l’œil ne peut le voir d’ordinaire. Sans pudeur, sans rien embellir, sans rien cacher, comme pour mieux rendre sa réalité intime. Mais le résultat est une image distorsionnée par le processus et le point de vue choisi par le photographe. Une tentative d’améliorer ou d’augmenter le perception ne mènerait finalement qu’à une autre perception.

Une déconstruction et reconstruction du corps. Un processus laborieux qui lui, ne se perçoit pas.






atelier d'éveil
02.08.2016

The female form for Roger Weiss


Inspired by the Japanese Kintsugi technique, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss captures and reconstructs the representation of his subjects through the layering of hundreds of photos in a single image.

The process – and the resulting works – serve as a study of the female form, one which “does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself,” explains the photographer. “My challenge is to seek the essence of the female being in a dimension that goes beyond the logos, through my vision – the one of a male,” he continues.

“My challenge is to seek the essence of the female being in a dimension that goes beyond the logos.”

Ispirato alla tecnica giapponese Kintsugi, il fotografo svizzero Roger Weiss cattura e ricostruisce l'immagine dei suoi soggetti attraverso la stratificazione di centinaia di foto in un'unica immagine.

Il processo - e le opere risultanti - servono per lo studio della forma femminile, quella che "non teme i segni della fragilità del corpo e le sue imperfezioni, ma piuttosto incoraggia l'immagine femminile ad apparire nel suo complesso: una forma di per sé, "spiega il fotografo. "La mia sfida è quella di cercare l'essenza dell'essere femminile in una dimensione che va oltre i loghi, attraverso la mia visione - quella di un uomo", continua.

"La mia sfida è quella di cercare l'essenza del femminile in una dimensione che va oltre il logo.”







ignant.com
By Anna Dorothea Ker, 20.07.2016

Reconstructing The Female Form


Inspired by the Japanese Kintsugi technique, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss captures and reconstructs the representation of his subjects through the layering of hundreds of photos in a single image.


“My challenge is to
seek the essence
of the female being
in a dimension that
goes beyond the
logos.”

The process – and the resulting works – serve as a study of the female form, one which “does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself,” explains the photographer. “My challenge is to seek the essence of the female being in a dimension that goes beyond the logos, through my vision – the one of a male,” he continues. To witness Weiss’ work process, watch this short video.







dazeddigital.com
31May 2016, TextAshleigh Kane

There’s a poignancy that runs through this month’s selections of the best photo stories from Fotografia magazine. Emotional stories come in the form of Susanna Majuri’s watery portraits of floating women, to Soham Gupta’s documentation of a ‘nighttime hellhole’ on the streets of India’s Kolkata, and Roger Weiss’s critique on the distortion of female beauty. Below Graziano Ferri, founder and editor of Fotografia, tells us his reasons behind his picks of his favourite series from the past month.

ROGER WEISS


“Despite working in the fashion industry for commercial projects, Swiss photographer Roger Weiss’ personal work has at its heart a critique to the mainstream standards of female beauty. Inspired by certain primitive artifacts representing the female figure, Weiss creates studio portraits of semi-nude girls who appear dilated, inflated, distorted. The effect is reached through an elaborate digital manipulation process of assembling bits and parts of the same photograph taken at different perspectives, which is vaguely derived from the ancient Japanese technique of repairing broken pottery known as kintsugi.”







beautifullyimperfects.net
Posted on June 1, 2016 by Martinamagrì

“Human dilatations”


Speaking of this project we talk about feminine beauty and photography, two worlds that cross each other, especially in this era in which technology to use the tools used to perform images that travel the border with the surreal.Lover of the small details of the human body that photography is able to locate in his goal, Roger Weiss likes to play with the expansion of the human body, just like the title of this fantastic series that you see below, Human dilatations, or a fragmented work and reassembly of a series of frames which create images of elongated bodies and very detailed in their natural beauty that goes beyond the aesthetic beauty standards with which bombardono us every day.

Photography is thus his business card and the images that accompany these lines show us his concept of photography that affects the viewer’s gaze to his constant search of imperfection.








interview.de

21.06.2016 | KATEGORIEN BEAUTY, FASHION, FOTOGRAFIE | TAGS AESTHETIC, ÄSTHETIK, BEAUTY,FOTOGRAFIE, KÖRPERIDEALE, PHOTOGRAPHY, ROGER WEISS, SCHÖNHEIT, SCHÖNHEITSIDEALE

Die Schock-Ästhetik des Roger Weiss


Roger Weiss wirft einen ungewohnten Blick auf weibliche Schönheit. Durch das Zusammenfügen hunderter Foto-Fragmente und extremen Verzerrungen bricht er mit idealisierten Körpervorstellungen.

In der Serie Human Dilatations erforscht der Schweizer Fotograf Roger Weiss die Vielseitigkeit des weiblichen Körpers aus ungewohnten und extremen Perspektiven. Übersättigt von gängigen, visuellen Repräsentationstechniken von Weiblichkeit, den immer gleichen Codes und perfektionierten Posen, legt Weiss den Fokus in seiner Serie gezielt auf die Körperpartien, die unperfekt oder „nicht in Form“ scheinen, uns aber zu einzigartigen und unverwechselbaren Menschen machen – gerade wegen ihrer vermeintlichen Fehlerhaftigkeit.

Der Künstler Kintsugi, der für eine in Japan populäre Technik der nicht perfekten Retusche durch das Überkleben von Goldelementen bekannt ist, inspirierte Weiss zu seinen Arbeiten. Für sein Fotoprojekt hat er zunächst unzählige Aufnahmen seiner Protagonistinnen in viele kleine Fragmente aufgesplittert, um sie anschließend wieder neu zusammenzusetzen. In der finalen Fotografie werden also hunderte Versatzstücke von ein- und derselben Person zusammengeführt, die er zuvor aus allen erdenklichen Perspektiven fotografiert hat. Mit dieser Technik stellt der Fotograf sicher, dass der Betrachter schlussendlich jede einzelne Körperstelle bis ins letzte Detail zu Gesicht bekommt – egal ob faltige Haut unter dem Fuß oder die Reiterhosen am Gesäß.

Weiss arbeitet ganz bewusst mit Kategorien wie Verzerrung, Ausdehnung und Übertreibung, um seine Bilder zu überspitzen. Die direkte Konfrontation mit dem Körperlichen mag zunächst überfordern, vielleicht auch schockieren, lenkt aber den Blick auf die Vielfältigkeit und Andersartigkeit der menschlichen Körper. Weiss erklärt das Imperfekte zur Schönheit und leistet mit seiner Schock-Ästhetik einen wichtigen Beitrag zu immer wieder entflammenden Diskussionen um Schönheits- und Körperideale, Fitnesswahn und Modekult.

Das Projekt Human Dilatations von Roger Weiss umfasst auch einige Videoarbeiten. Mehr über die Serie und weitere Arbeiten des Künstler finden Sie auf seiner Webseite.







slipperyedge.com
21.06.2016

Roger Weiss


Roger Weiss is a photographer from Switzerland. He began experimenting with photography from an early age and later on his curiosity about the expressions of humankind led him to take the path of an artistic approach. He graduated with a Mention of Excellence from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, in Milan, Italy and works today as an artist and a fashion photographer. He captures fragments of human tragedy, documenting failures and yearnings, weaknesses and strengths, pains and joys, rights violated and rights upheld. For his latest work “Human Dilatations”, Weiss is inspired by the Kintsugi Japanese technique, where the subject is fragmented and then reassembled, and a series of hundreds of photos are then unified into a single image. The result is a particularly detailed analysis of the body where contemporary human beings are portrayed stripped of physical perfection and power of mind. Each image represents a body whose proportions are partially distorted and prevails over a head that dissolves, without leaving a trace. The marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections are not to be feared, but encouraged. The female figure appears as a whole: a shape by itself, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.







cultture.com
19 Mayo 2016 4:35 · Iñigo Montoya

Fotos de modelos desnudas y dilataciones humanas de Roger Weiss


LAS MODELOS DESNUDAS DE ROGER WEISS

Las increíbles fotos de modelos desnudas y dilataciones humanas de Roger Weiss

La verdadera belleza no está en el interior, lo que te cuides ni en lo tendy que seas a la hora de ponerte en forma y pasar por el doctor para que te haga los arreglitos de moda para tener el culo de la Kim Kardashian y las tetas de la Sabrina Salerno. La verdadera belleza, la que de verdad importa, esta en los ojos del que mira. Un axioma tan cierto en la vida real como lo pueda ser en el arte, y que el fotógrafo suizo Roger Weiss ha querido poner a prueba con su nueva colección de modelos desnuda.

Usando perspectivas imposibles, lentes que deforman la luz hasta convertir los cuerpos de sus musas en sudorosas esculturas de carne informe que se retuercen como grumos de petroleo danzando al son de la marea, el autor se aleja de cualquier forma de convención para jugar de forma traviesa con nuestra imaginación, y hacernos soñar con cuerpos que desafían a la lógica en una nueva forma de belleza.

Disfruta de las espectaculares fotos de modelos desnudas y dilataciones humanas de Roger Weiss. Una maravilla más allá de las leyes del entendimiento:  







http://emma-nubel.com
Publié le 25/04/2016 par Emma Nubel

L’oeuvre de la semaine#11 : Roger Weiss, Human Dilatations


Photo d’un corps de femme nue, bras tendus et regard vers le haut. Au premier coup d’oeil, rien d’anormal. Mais très vite on se rend compte que les proportions sont fausses. La main est trop proche, les pieds immenses, le visage très loin. Ce travail de Roger Weiss perturbe. La profondeur se fait ressentir, le corps est grand et allongé. Contre-plongée ou vue de face ? On ne sait plus. Le regard et ses perceptions sont perdus. Les repères spatiaux dans l’image sont inexistants. Allongée ou debout contre un mur, cette femme qui nous ignore flotte presque dans un espace froid. Un certain malaise s’installe. Cette femme devient dérangeante, ses proportions sont anormales. Non monstrueux mais pourtant étrange, son corps parait s’étirer et s’approcher de nous tout en s’éloignant. Inatteignable et pourtant presque tangible on a envie d’éprouver ces proportions déraisonnables. Comment est-ce possible ? En scrutant chaque morceau on remarque que les formes sont exactes. Cependant, mis ensemble le tout est distordu, lointain mais si proche. Le collage et les lignes de rencontre entre les neuf photographies exhibent ce morcellement qui compose cet assemblage. La question de la réalisation n’en est que plus forte.

Roger Weiss questionne l’image de la femme contemporaine, idéalisée et fantasmée. Quête de la perfection physique déformée par  l’esprit, cette image nous renvoie l’oscillation entre les deux.   Détachée du stéréotype du corps de la femme parfaite, cette photo de la série « Human Dilatations » nous exhibe un corps dans son ensemble, formant un tout harmonieux par un point de vue masculin sur un corps féminin si idéalisé et retouché.







barbarapicci.com
19 MARZO 2016 BARBARA PICCI

Il fotografo della settimana – I nudi dilatati di Roger Weiss


Human Dilatations” è il titolo dell’ultima serie del fotografo Roger Weiss interamente incentrata sul corpo. Utilizzando la pratica giapponese del Kintsugi, egli lavora su frammenti/scatti fotografici che riunisce e trasforma in opere di grande formato.

In questi corpi la testa svanisce, il volto è solo accennato. Ciò che conta è il corpo femminile che viene “dilatato” attraverso questa ricomposizione andando ad allontanarsi dagli stereotipi della bellezza canonica e socialmente acquisita.

Nato in Svizzera, Roger Weiss inizia a fotografare sin da piccolo. Più tardi si laurea con una menzione di merito all’Accademia di Brera. Oggi lavora sia nel campo della moda che in quello più prettamente artistico. Human Dilatations segue “I am Flesh“, serie precedente che appare più immatura e legata alla moda. Qui il fotografo sembra invece aver superato la fase di assestamento per affermare la sua definitiva e intensa (anti)estetica.

Ecco le immagini. Buona visione!







culturacolectiva.com
Por: Andrea Mendez 19 de octubre, 2015

Human Dilatations; en busca de la esencia femenina


“Capturo fragmentos sobre la tragedia humana, documentando los fracasos y anhelos, las debilidades y fortalezas, pesares y alegrías, derechos violados y derechos defendidos”.

Roger Weiss

El todo es más que la suma de sus partes; el mundo siempre se ha visto en fragmentos. No todo es atractivo, no todo es bueno, no todo nos interesa, no todo nos gusta. Sólo tomamos lo que queremos y vemos lo que queremos ver, existen partes de nuestro cuerpo que odiamos y que nos acomplejan por el resto de la vida. Tal vez si viéramos las cosas completas, con todo y las imperfecciones, las debilidades, los errores y los desastres, aprenderíamos a aceptarnos tal como somos; encontraríamos nuestra esencia y nos amaríamos un poco más.

El cuerpo femenino es constantemente modificado a la imagen y semejanza de la sociedad, siempre aumentándole o quitándole, pero nunca dejándolo ser, nunca en su estado original, siempre con miedo a que las proporciones puedan salirse de los límites de lo considerado bello.  

Roger Weiss es un fotógrafo suizo obsesionado con la transfiguración de la imagen humana, estudió arte en la Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera de Milán y se da dedicado a la fotografía artística y de moda. Captura sus objetos desde perspectivas nunca antes exploradas y al hacerlo, consigue que algunos conceptos tomen un nuevo significado. Weiss plantea que la imagen de la mujer siempre ha estado reducida a patrones; siempre ha sido una combinación de códigos y modelos preestablecidos, en la que la perfección física predomina ante el todo.

En su serie fotográfica Human Dilatations pone el cuerpo femenino en primer plano, como un todo unificado, desde perspectivas que distorsionan sus proporciones, en las que la cabeza se desaparece y la fragilidad, las imperfecciones y los ángulos “incómodos” alientan a las mujeres a mostrarse tal cual son.

Human Dilatations significa una búsqueda de la esencia femenina, a través de los ojos y el corazón de un hombre. Weiss se inspiró en los simbolismos de las diosas de la era neolítica: en los monolitos, los cuales han sobrevivido a través del tiempo e integran al cuerpo femenino en un todo, también en el misterio alrededor de la vida, la muerte y la regeneración.

Roger utilizó la técnica japonesa de reparación tradicional Kintsugi, en la cual el sujeto está fragmentado en partes y luego vuelto a montar, unificando una serie de cientos de fotografías en una misma imagen. El resultado es una visión particular y analítica de cada detalle del cuerpo, cuyas proporciones están parcialmente distorsionadas a través de la combinación de diferentes ópticas fotográficas.

Las fotografías de Human Dilatations no tienen censura al mostrar el cuerpo de las mujeres actuales. Bajo perspectivas y ángulos que jamás veríamos en algún otro lado podemos entender que la esencia femenina no se encuentra en algunas las partes, yace en aceptarnos como un todo.






www.apar.tv
02.08.2015

L’IMPÉNÉTRABLE CHEMIN DE LA BEAUTÉ


Une nouvelle expo de Ron Mueck ? Non. Bien que ces corps distordus perdent de leur réalité, et rejoignent ce continent vaporeux où se promènent les sculptures de Ron Mueck, ils sont bien réel.

« La quête de l’être humain se distingue par deux éléments : la perfection du corps et le pouvoir/rôle de l’esprit. » Roger Weiss est un photographe suisse qui prend ses clichés, non par comme des reflets de la réalité, mais comme des échos des pratiques sociales et psychologiques de l’humain. Une approche quasi ethnologique.

« Mon chemin débute avec cette idée que l’image des femmes contemporaines a été réduite à une structure, une combinaison de codes et de modèles qui nous mènent à la femme comme individu, alors que le chemin devrait se faire exactement à l’inverse. »

En s’inspirant de la technique japonaise du Kintsugi et en jouant de ses objectifs, de découpages, collages… Roger Weiss pousse la beauté/laideur au niveau de l’illusion d’optique.

J’ai vu une femme, ombre de beauté, que la lumière a révélée. Danse fascinante entre deux mondes. Insaisissable et indéfinissable, c’est ça la femme.







litriotpress.com
Roger Weiss: Human Dilatations_Suspension | Human Dilatations_Monoliths

ROGER WEISS: HUMAN DILATATIONS – SUSPENSION AND MONOLITHS


Human Dilatations_Suspension and Human Dilatations_Monoliths, by photographer and artist Roger Weiss, explore contemporary notions of physical perfection and our views of the human body. As Weiss states: Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty (rogerweiss.ch, 2015). We really couldn’t pull ourselves away from the screen with his work and we were equally impressed with the approach to this project. Make sure to check out the sketches and storyboards by Weiss. A remarkable and detailed undertaking.

The Project Technique

The “Monoliths” and “Suspensions” in Human Dilatations by Roger Weiss are inspired by theKintsugi Japanese technique, the subject is fragmented and then reassembled, unifying a series of photograms. The resulting vision is a particular and detailed analysis of every detail of the human body.







organiconcrete.com
By Eva Di Tullio - 7/7/2015 - Fotografia | Tuesday poison -

Tuesday Poison: Roger Weiss

Il surrealismo della dilatazione umana


Quel che non è leggermente difforme ha un aspetto insensibile, ne deriva che l’irregolarità, ossia l’imprevisto, la sorpresa, lo stupore sono una parte essenziale e la caratteristica della bellezza.
(Charles Baudelaire)

La citazione rubacchiata dagli ultimi appunti sparsi del celebre scrittore e poeta ma anche critico letterario, critico d’arte, giornalista, aforista, saggista e traduttore francese è particolarmente adatta all’artista di cui voglio parlarvi in questa caldissima puntata diTuesday Poison, ovvero Roger Weiss. Con lui oggi si parla di bellezza femminile e di fotografia, due mondi che si attraversano reciprocamente, soprattutto in quest’era tecnologia nella quale l’uso degli strumenti consente di realizzare delle immagini che viaggiano al confine con il surreale.

Il nostro ospite di questo martedì è nato in Svizzera ma ha compiuto i suoi studi presso l’Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera a Milano e il suo percorso nel mondo dell’arte pare abbia avuto inizio in tenera età e oggi è un artista ma anche fashion photographer di grande successo. La fotografia è dunque il suo biglietto da visita e le immagini che accompagnano queste righe ci fanno vedere il suo concetto di fotografia che colpisce lo sguardo dell’osservatore per la sua costante ricerca dell’imperfezione. Da qui ho preso in prestito la citazione con la quale ho aperto questo articolo.

Amante dei piccoli dettagli del corpo umano che la fotografia riesce a rintracciare nel suo obiettivo, Roger Weiss ama giocare con la dilatazione del corpo umano, proprio come il titolo di questa fantastica serie che vedete qua sotto, Human Dilatations, ovvero un lavoro di frammentazione e riassemblamento di una serie di fotogrammi che creano immagini di corpi allungati e particolarmente dettagliati nella loro bellezza naturale che si spinge oltre i canoni di bellezza estetica con i quali ci bombardono ogni giorno.

Il suo punto di riferimento è la tecnica giapponese definita Kintsugi, ovvero un lavoro particolare di restauro di ceramiche attraverso il fissaggio con oro, argento o platino che affonda le sue radici in tempi molto lontani. Dunque il fotografo svizzero si ispira a questa tecnica giapponese per comporre tante parti di un’immagine corporea per poi restituirla agli occhi dell’osservatore come forse non si aspettava di vederla, intrisa di quel surrealismo deforme che mette in discussione la normale percezione sia della bellezza che del corpo umano in generale. Forse la mia siegazione non reande abbastanza il concetto ma provando ad osservare le fotografie aggiunte di seguito credo sia facilmente percepibile il grande lavoro di Roger Weiss, il quale mette a nudo alcune particolarità della nostra presenza fisica, come dita dei piedi e gambe allungate, che in altri contesti passerebbero inosservati.






Les Blogs
De l'art helvétique contemporain
rubrique des arts plastiques et de la littérature en Suisse
By Jean-Paul Gavard-Perret 10/07/2015

Qu’en termes étranges ces « choses »-là sont montrées : Roger Weiss


Roger Weiss avec sa série « Human Dilatation » ne  cherche pas à exorbiter le corps par effet déformant pour faire jaillir « du » monstre. Il n’insiste pas non plus sur la prétendue  fragilité ou les éventuelles imperfections de ses modèles féminins. Les angles de distorsion permettent de casser les stéréotypes hypocrites que l’idéologie imageante mondialisante fait porter au féminin. La notion de beauté en est donc modifiée.

Weiss 2.jpgLe déséquilibre entre les parties du corps retranche les idées reçues, rompt le ceintrage admis. Le physique féminin apparaît en termes étrangers, il se détache des lignes « haricots verts » pour montrer le vide des illusions optiques que nous caressons. Insolent le photographe suisse donne au corps une insolvabilité. Elle permet de nous dénouer de nos percepts.  Chaque photographie devient une insurgée. Sans assise ou déboîté le corps à la fois rentre en lui et en sort de manière intempestive. Il est l’indice agaçant créateur d’ouverture par l’audace du photographe. L’image de la femme, de simple « support » confortable, devient un manifeste dadaïste de déconditionnement du conformisme.

Roger Weiss, « Human dilatation »







www.delfi.lv
29.09.2015FOTO PROJEKTI Mākslas darbi rodas mokās, Optiskās ilūzijas

ŠĀDOS RAKURSOS SIEVIEŠU ĶERMENI JŪS VĒL NEBŪSIET REDZĒJUŠI


FOTO PROJEKTI Mākslas darbi rodas mokās, Optiskās ilūzijas

Šveiciešu fotogrāfs Rodžers Vaiss (Roger Weiss) ne tikai necenšas apslēpt sieviešu figūras trūkumus, bet drīzāk pat ķermeņa nepilnības parādīt visā krāšņumā, tāpēc arī radījis pārsteidzošu foto sēriju ar nosaukumu 'Human Dilatations' ('Cilvēka paplašinājums’).

1 Neproporcionālie attēli skatītāju zināmā mērā atgrūž un pat izraisa riebumu, tomēr apziņa, ka tas ir tikai rakursa jautājums un subjektīva skaistuma uztvere, liek uz Vaisa darbiem noraudzīties ar pastiprinātu interesi.

2 Foto projekta ‘Human Dilatations’ mērķis ir pievērst uzmanību diviem mūsdienu cilvēka dzīves aspektiem, kurus viņi izmanto ikdienas lēmumu pieņemšanā: proti, fiziskā pilnība un reālais viņa saprāta spēks.

3 Katra fotogrāfija ir kā izkropļots ķermenis, un šo ilūziju pastiprina fakts, ka kāda ķermeņa daļa izskatās lielāka nekā cilvēka galva.

4 “Tie ir kā cilvēciskās traģēdijas fragmenti. Es iemūžinu cerības, vājības, stiprās puses, sāpes, prieku – visu, kas cilvēkam ir, un visu, kas cilvēkam ir atņemts,” komentē fotogrāfiju autors.

5 Vaiss stāsta, ka ar cilvēka ķermeņa reproducēšanu, studēšanu un sadalīšanu gabalos nodarbojušies daudzi mākslinieki: no Sezanna un Pikaso līdz de Kiriko, Matisam un Bēkonam, bet mūsdienās – līdz Lusjēnam Freidam un Dženijai Savilai, kuri visi tiecās meklēt cilvēka pirmatnējo veidolu.

6 Vaiss dzimis Šveicē un jau bērnībā aizrāvies ar fotogrāfiju. Viņš ar izcilību absolvējis ‘Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera’ Milānā, šobrīd strādā par modes fotogrāfu, bet paralēli darbojas arī mākslas jomā.

7 Interviju ar Rodžeru Vaisu, kurā viņš atklāj savas domas par ‘Human Dilatations’ projektu un mūsdienu mākslu kopumā, var izlasīt žurnālā ‘Vogue’.

Vēl dažas fotogrāfijas no projekta 'Human Dilatations' var apskatīt šeit:







scene360.com

FISHEYE PERSPECTIVES OF THE BODY BY ROGER WEISS


It’s hard to find new ways and angles to shoot nudes these days, it feels like everything has been done before. Roger Weiss has certainly put a fresh spin on it by photographing his models from his Fisheye perspective. This way nothing is hidden and parts of the body which are usually invisible, become crystal clear.







www3.it.ch
di Roberto Raineri-Seith 15.07.2015

Krinein, è online con un nuovo portfolio dedicato a Roger Weiss - Human Dilatations



In Human Dilatations, attraverso l'utilizzo di materia frammentata e successivamente ricomposta, Roger Weiss conferisce corpo ad una visione altra del corpo femminile, emancipata dagli stereotipi legati alla concezione commerciale di bellezza tipica dell'imaging pubblicitario.
La serie evidenzia chiari riferimenti alle "Perspectives of Nudes" di Bill Brandt in alcuni scatti esplicitamente citate; se la ripresa di un esperimento non soltanto formale ampiamente storicizzato ad alcuni può apparire riduttivo, non ci si stancherà al contempo mai di ricordare che dal postmodernismo in poi l'operazione trova una sua raison d'être sia sul piano della legittima reinterpretazione di un tema, sia soprattutto per il viaggio temporale nella contemporaneità anche tecnologica (l'utilizzo da parte di Weiss della tecnica di assemblaggio digitale di centinaia di scatti singoli rispetto alle distorsioni ottiche in analogico di Brandt) e il conseguente radicalmente diverso risultato espressivo, estetico e concettuale.
Tra gli elementi che rappresentano uno scarto nettissimo con il lavoro di Brandt vi è in primo luogo l'obiettivo di conservare, con autoptica precisione, il maggior numero possibile di informazioni fotografiche relative al soggetto o piu' precisamente a parti dello stesso. Radicalmente diversi sono poi il rapporto con il corpo femminile e con gli interrogativi che lo stesso suscita nell'attuale contesto storico. Nelle intenzioni e parole dell'autore, Human Dilatations infatti non teme i segmenti della cedevolezza del corpo insieme alle sue imperfezioni, ma accompagna l'immagine femminile ad apparire nel suo insieme come una forma altra, in un gioco di distorsioni che permette di rapportarsi all'immagine in modo cangiante, distaccandosi completamente dal gusto stereotipato ed ipocrita del bello.
La serie completa, costituita da 35 stampe di grande formato, invita ad esplorare visivamente altrettanti corpi ricchi di minuziosi dettagli, offrendo un'esperienza quasi tattile. Ogni loro singolo dettaglio è stato acquisito fotograficamente per poi essere ricomposto reinterpretando le proporzioni originali dei soggetti della serie e cercando di escludere il più possibile la percezione di un intervento artistico dell’autore.








beautifuldecay.com
by Chad Saville 16.09.13

Roger Weiss’ Photographs Distort The Objectification Of Women


Roger Weiss is a Swiss-born photographer educated at the Accademia di Brera, in Milan. His fashion and fine art photography displays an obsession with the human form. Weiss teases sensuality and subversive themes from his subjects, flaunting them in evocative ways to touch on issues of the objectification of women.

Human Dilations is a study in the feminine form and foray into the subject of beauty and it’s stereotypes. A woman is often boiled down info a series of visual queues that objectify and define her. This project studies whether each form—in it’s distortion and elation—is a physical whole, or simply an object.

“Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections,” said Weiss. “But rather, encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.” (via savage)

View other series by Roger Weiss here.







www.suru.lt
Justė Tyčia 2013-09-19

Human Dilatations


Šveicarų kilmės fotografo Roger Weiss darbų serija “Human Dilatations” – greičiausiai tikrai ne bandymas parodyti moters kūno linkių trapumą ir visumos dieviškumą. Sakyčiau net priešingai – tai gan akivaizdus protestas prieš stereotipinę ir dažnai veidmainišką grožio sąvoką. Kadrai švelnūs, bet ne saldūs, o aš saldžiai ir nemėgstu:







juxtapoz.com
July 06, 2015

“HUMAN DILATATIONS,” PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROGER WEISS


JUXTAPOZ // Monday, 26 Aug 2013 Swiss photographer Roger Weiss’ Human Dilatation series ‘does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of istortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the sterotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.’







khorai.org
by KHORAI in Art MAY 7, 2014

ARTWATCH: HUMAN DILATIONS


Artist Roger Weiss’s latest work, Human Dilatations, explores the feminine form and society’s objectification of it. The subject is fragmented and then reassembled through an ancient Japanese pottery repair technique, creating a series of photographs with unusual proportions. Each draws attention to a particular detail of the body, with the aim of celebrating it rather than disguising it or focusing on what is “broken.”

Describing his pieces, Weiss says, “Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections, but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image – entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.”

What do you think? Have women been reduced to patterns in images? And by playing with stereotypes, is Weiss’s installment effectively questioning such traditional notions of beauty?            








agonistica.com
Nov 11, 2013

Human Dilatations by Roger Weiss


The image of women of our times has been reduced to a pattern, a combination of codes and models that lead to the woman/individual instead of the other way around.

Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.

Roger Weiss.








Nastya Travkina
24 Apr at 8:36 am

Замечательная работа по телесным искажением, дичайше рекомендую.



Роджер Вайс рисует эскизы искаженного тела, и потом по ним “собирает” из десятка фотографий одной и той же модели - но разной крупности - нужные формы тела. В каком-то смысле это гипернатурализм - не только из-за подробностей тела, но и потому что редко кто из нас видит “картинное” пропорциональное тело - так как ничто мы не видим без искажений, если приближаемся к нему достаточно близко. Лицом к лицу лица не увидать - и тела тоже.







nuncalosabre.com
9 septiembre, 2013

Roger Weiss nació en Suiza y comenzó a experimentar con la fotografía desde muy temprana edad.  Se graduó con mención de Excelencia de la Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milán (Italia).

“Human Dilatations” no teme las marcas de la fragilidad del cuerpo y de sus imperfecciones, sino que anima a la imagen femenina para que aparezca como un todo: una forma por sí misma, en un juego de distorsiones que permite relacionar de manera diferente a la imagen, totalmente separada de la noción estereotipada e hipócrita de la belleza.








emptykingdom.com
BY KONAHRTIST - SEPTEMBER 2, 2013

HUMAN DILATATIONS


We bring the uber talented Roger Weiss back to EK with two series exploring the human form: “Human Dilatations” and “I am Flesh”. Mr. Weiss was previously featured back in June 2010, and it’s our pleasure to share more of his work with all of you! I highly encourage folks to visit his site to read up on more of his art projects.  







socks-studio.com

Human Dilatations, by Roger Weiss (2013)


Roger Weiss is a Switzerland-born photographer. His artistic approach centers on the human body, from the surface of the skin to the depths of the soul.

His Human Dilatations series alters the feminine identity, playing against classical proportions and questioning traditional ideas of beauty.

“The image of women of our times has been reduced to a pattern, a combination of codes and models that lead to the woman/individual instead of the other way around.

Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections but rather encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.”    







beautifulsavage.com
by Chad Saville /September 14, 2013

ROGER WEISS “HUMAN DILATIONS”


This exquisitely weird series studies the hypocrisy of beauty.

Roger Weiss, who we’ve featured before, is a Swiss-born photographer educated at the Accademia di Brera, in Milan. His work in the visual arts and fashion reveals an obsession with transfiguring the human image, teasing out sensual and subversive themes, so he may flaunt them in angular and provocative ways.

Human Dilations is a study in the feminine form and an exquisitely weird foray into the subject of beauty and it’s stereotypes. A woman is often boiled down info a series of visual queues that objectify and define her. This project studies whether each form—in it’s distortion and elation—is a physical whole, or simply an object.

“Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections,” said Weiss. “But rather, encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.”